neuromuscular

(redirected from neuromuscular blockade)
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neu·ro·mus·cu·lar

 (no͝or′ō-mŭs′kyə-lər, nyo͝or′-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affecting both nerves and muscles.
2. Having the characteristics of both nervous and muscular tissue.

neuromuscular

(ˌnjʊərəʊˈmʌskjʊlə)
adj
(Physiology) of, relating to, or affecting nerves and muscles. Also: myoneural

neu•ro•mus•cu•lar

(ˌnʊər oʊˈmʌs kyə lər, ˌnyʊər-)

adj.
pertaining to or affecting both nerves and muscles.
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.neuromuscular - affecting or characteristic of both neural and muscular tissue
Translations
nervosvalový

neu·ro·mus·cu·lar

a. neuromuscular, rel. a nervios y músculos;
___ blocking agentsagentes bloqueadores neuromusculares;
___ relaxantrelajador ___;
___ systemsistema ___.

neuromuscular

adj neuromuscular
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical practice guidelines for sustained neuromuscular blockade in the adult critically ill patient.
Sugammadex: A novel agent for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Pharmacotherapy 2007;27:1181-8.
[2] With proper and optimal monitoring of the depth of neuromuscular blockade, continuous infusions are safe to use and give a stable and easily reversible neuromuscular block.
Elise Hyman, Blink's VP of Clinical Operations added, "We are partnering with large institutions to implement hospital-wide programs to improve their management of neuromuscular blockade. These programs involve education, reliable quantitative monitoring provided by our TwitchView System, and EMR connectivity to track progress and support quality initiatives.
He was treated with multiple continuous intravenous medication infusions to control his pain and blood pressure, and with neuromuscular blockade to manage his muscle spasms.
schneideri poison was shown to act presynaptically by irreversibly blocking acetylcholine release; no co-participation of post-synaptic nicotinic receptors on the neuromuscular blockade was observed (Rostelato-Ferreira, Dal Belo, Cruz-Hofling, Hyslop, & Rodrigues-Simioni, 2011).
The patient was extubated after recovery of neuromuscular blockade and adequate spontaneous breathing.
The case described had an atypical clinical course, as the child showed prolonged neuromuscular blockade and apnoea beyond what would be expected of the acute cholinergic crisis after decontamination and atropinisation.
In general, the most commonly used agents belong to the following classes: (a) nonnarcotic analgesic/ antipyretic, salicylate analgesic/antipyretic, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); (b) agents to induce arterial vasodilation; (c) opioid analgesics; (d) [alpha]-agonists; (e) anesthetics and sedatives; (f) serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) agonists; (g) N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists; and (h) neuromuscular blockade (NMB) agents.
Neuromuscular blockade for 48 hours was utilized vs placebo and resulted in significant improvement in oxygenation, manifested by a higher Pa[O.sub.2]/Fi[O.sub.2] ratio at 48, 96, and 120 hours postrandomization.