neutrino


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neu·tri·no

 (no͞o-trē′nō, nyo͞o-)
n. pl. neu·tri·nos
Any of three electrically neutral leptons (the electron neutrino, muon neutrino and tau neutrino—one in each of the three generations of elementary fermions) that have small or very small masses.

[Italian, from neutrino, little neutral one : neutro, neuter, neutral (from Latin neuter, neutr-, neuter; see neuter) + -ino, dimutive suff. (from Latin -īnus, adj. suff.; see -ine1). Coined by Enrico Fermi on the model of Italian neutrone, neutron, taken as the augmentative of Italian neutro.]

neutrino

(njuːˈtriːnəʊ)
n, pl -nos
(General Physics) physics a stable leptonic neutral elementary particle with very small or possibly zero rest mass and spin that travels at the speed of light. Three types exist, associated with the electron, the muon, and the tau particle
[C20: from Italian, diminutive of neutrone neutron]

neu•tri•no

(nuˈtri noʊ, nyu-)

n., pl. -nos.
a massless or nearly massless electrically neutral lepton.
[< Italian (1933)]

neu·tri·no

(no͞o-trē′nō)
Any of three electrically neutral subatomic particles that travel at the speed of light. Neutrinos are thought to have a mass that is too close to zero, when they are not moving, to be measured.
Did You Know? Neutrinos were not observed until 1955, roughly a quarter of a century after the physicist Wolfgang Pauli first proposed, on theoretical grounds, that they might exist. Pauli was studying certain radioactive decay processes in which it seemed that energy somehow mysteriously disappeared. He suggested that the energy was carried away by a very small, electrically neutral particle that was not being detected. (He originally wanted to name the particle a neutron but didn't publish the suggestion, and a few years later the particle we now know as the neutron was discovered and named in print. The Italian physicist Enrico Fermi then coined the term neutrino, which means "little neutron" in Italian.) Neutrinos are hard to detect because they interact only very weakly with other forms of matter. Most of the neutrinos that reach the Earth from space pass right through and go out the other side. Even a chunk of iron a few light-years thick would stop only about half of the neutrinos that struck it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neutrino - an elementary particle with zero charge and zero mass
lepton - an elementary particle that participates in weak interactions; has a baryon number of 0
Translations

neutrino

nNeutrino nt

neutrino

[njuːˈtriːnəʊ] nneutrino
References in periodicals archive ?
Takaaki Kajita on Tuesday delivered a lecture on "Discovery of Neutrino Oscillations" to students and faculty of Amity University here.
They exist in three different flavors, or types, though a fourth flavor - the sterile neutrino - is hypothesized and is a dark matter candidate.
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The determination of the neutrino mass and the calculation of other characteristic parameters provided out later in this article are the final confirmation of the correctness of the chosen model.
Massive Neutrinos: Flavor Mixing of Leptons and Neutrino Oscillations
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Neutrino Hunters: The Thrilling Chase for a Ghostly particle to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe comes from an astrophysicist and science writer who tells of the neutrino's discovery, providing both science and a biography of scientists involved in research.
Next, they hope to build on the early success of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory to detect the source of these high-energy particles, said Physics Professor Gregory Sullivan, who led the University of Maryland's 12-person team of contributors to the IceCube Collaboration.
Francis Halzen, a physics professor at the University of Wisconsin who is the principal investigator for the project, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory.
Nine presentations from the July 2011 school introduce the role of neutrinos in understanding cosmology and stars, the origin and nature of cosmic radiation, the design of low-energy neutrino detectors, and the physics and operation of neutrino telescopes.