neutron


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neu·tron

 (no͞o′trŏn′, nyo͞o′-)
n. Abbr. n
The electrically neutral nucleon, a baryon composed of two down quarks and one up quark, which has a mass 1,839 times that of an electron, is stable when bound in an atomic nucleus, but has a mean lifetime of 886 seconds as a free particle. It is a basic component of all atomic nuclei except the protium isotope of hydrogen.

neutron

(ˈnjuːtrɒn)
n
(General Physics) physics a neutral elementary particle with a rest mass of 1.674 92716 × 10–27 kilogram and spin ; classified as a baryon. In the nucleus of an atom it is stable, but when free it decays
[C20: from neutral, on the model of electron]

neu•tron

(ˈnu trɒn, ˈnyu-)

n.
an elementary particle found in most atomic nuclei, having no charge, mass slightly greater than that of a proton, and spin of ½. Symbol: n
[1921; neutr (al) + -on1]

neu·tron

(no͞o′trŏn′)
An electrically neutral subatomic particle that is part of the nucleus of an atom and has a mass slightly greater than that of a proton. Beams of neutrons from nuclear reactors are used to bombard the atoms of various elements to produce fission and other nuclear reactions and to determine the atomic arrangements in molecules. See more at atom.

neutron

1. One of the three basic particles in an atoms. It is found in the nucleus and has zero charge.
2. A subatomic particle with roughly the mass of a proton and no electric charge.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neutron - an elementary particle with 0 charge and mass about equal to a protonneutron - an elementary particle with 0 charge and mass about equal to a proton; enters into the structure of the atomic nucleus
nucleon - a constituent (proton or neutron) of an atomic nucleus
Translations
نيوتْرون
neutron
neutron
neutron
neutron
nifteind
neutronas
neitrons
nêutron
neutrón
neutron

neutron

[ˈnjuːtrɒn]
A. Nneutrón m
B. CPD neutron bomb Nbomba f de neutrones
neutron star Nestrella f de neutrones

neutron

[ˈnjuːtrɒn] nneutron mneutron bomb nbombe f à neutrons

neutron

nNeutron nt

neutron

:
neutron bomb
neutron star
nNeutronenstern m

neutron

[ˈnjuːtrɒn] nneutrone m

neutron

(ˈnjuːtron) noun
one of the particles which make up the nucleus of an atom.
References in periodicals archive ?
An important link in the theory of neutron physics cycle of nuclear reactors is the theory of neutron moderation [1 - 7].
Santilli states, "The low energy neutron source in production and sale by Thunder Energies Corporation is the result of mathematical and theoretical studies I initiated at Harvard university in the 1980's under DOE support and then continued with private funds.
When SpaceX launches its eleventh cargo mission to ISS for NASA - using a Falcon 9 rocket June 1 - it will include an instrument called Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), the first NASA mission dedicated to the study of neutron stars.
The conventional interpretation for the observed Dirac-delta-shape pulse-like radio emission was based on the lighthouse model of pulsars as fast rotating neutron stars [9-12].
The new Neutron series of Gigabit PoE+ Wireless Management Switches enables IT managers to manage multiple EnGenius Neutron Series Managed Wireless Access Points from a powerful, intuitive browser-based software platform.
Neutron stars are too far away to study their composition, and scientists cannot re-create the enormous pressures in the lab.
The Neutron and Neutron GTX SSDs are powered by the LM87800 SSD controller from Link_A_Media Devices (LAMD).
The scientists used an effect of Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity to measure the mass of the neutron star and its orbiting companion, a white dwarf star.
"Now, we finally understand that it can be produced by a hot neutron star with a carbon atmosphere," he added.
The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beam Line (FNPB) recently opened its shutter to receive neutrons for the first time.
disintegrates, it expels on average two high-energy neutrons. If one of these is absorbed by exactly one other atom causing it also to disintegrate, the "chain reaction" is termed "critical." In U.S.
Finally, we acknowledge the generous financial support of the NIST Physics Laboratory and Ionizing Radiation Division, North Carolina State University, the University of Tennessee/Oak Ridge National Laboratory Joint Institute for Neutron Science, Harvard University, the Institut Laue-Langevin, LENS: the Low Energy Neutron Source, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the Institute of Physics Publishing, Inc.