nevus


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ne·vus

 (nē′vəs)
n. pl. ne·vi (-vī′)
Any of various congenital or acquired lesions of the skin or oral mucosa that are usually pigmented and raised and may include epidermal, connective, vascular, or other types of tissue.

[Latin naevus.]

ne′void′ (-void′) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nevus

(ˈniːvəs)
n, pl -vi (-vaɪ)
(Medicine) the usual US spelling of naevus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ne•vus

(ˈni vəs)

n., pl. -vi (-vī).
any congenital anomaly of the skin, including moles and various types of birthmarks.
[< Latin naevus mole]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nevus - a blemish on the skin that is formed before birthnevus - a blemish on the skin that is formed before birth
blemish, mar, defect - a mark or flaw that spoils the appearance of something (especially on a person's body); "a facial blemish"
nevus flammeus, port-wine stain - a flat birthmark varying from pink to purple
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ne·vus

n. nevo, lunar, marca de nacimiento.
comedonicus ______ comedónico;
compound ______ compuesto;
dysplastic ______ de displasia, con algunas células malignas;
faun tail ______ de cola de fauno;
flammeus ______ flamante;
junction, junctional ______ de unión;
melanocytic ______ melanocítico;
sebaceous ______ sebáceo.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

nevus

n (pl nevi) nevo; dysplastic — nevo displásico
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A general rule of thumb is to be cautious about diagnosing melanoma when an experienced clinician has made a clinical diagnosis of a nevus. (1) Conversely, however, it is not rare to counter a clinical diagnosis of melanoma if the histologic features are those of a benign lesion.
CONGENITAL MELANOCYTIC NEVUS | The congenital melanocytic nevus is a type of melanocytic nevus (or mole) found in birth.
For example, many consider a nevus sebaceous to be a type of epidermal nevus as well.
The study included 438 patients who had 467 biopsies that indicated incomplete excision of a moderately dysplastic nevus from 1990 to 2014.
Melanocytic proliferations are composed of one or more of three related cell types: melanocytes, nevus cells or melanoma cells, each of which may be located in the epidermis or the dermis.
The pathology was proven to be an intradermal nevus (figure, C).
Histopathology was consistent with Becker's nevus. Based on history, suggestive clinical findings and further supported by histopathology, a diagnosis of acral Becker's nevus was made.
It may also be called nevus flammeus (neonatorum) or nevus simplex.
The teledermoscopic diagnoses were pigmented basal cell carcinoma (3), intradermal nevus (6), seborrheic keratosis (4), benign melanocytic lesion (12), blue nevus (3), intracorneal hematoma (1), atypical nevus melanocytic suspicion (2), dermatofibroma (1), congenital nevus (1), solar lentigo (2), and melanoma (4).
Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) is primarily considered a slowflow venous malformation, although there has been a single case report which includes a lymphatic component [3].
Of these extremely rare lesions, the most commonly found is the prostatic blue nevus, also known as pigmented melanocytosis or prostatic pigmentary nevohyperplasia [1].