new town


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

new town

n.
A planned urban community designed for self-sufficiency and providing housing, educational, commercial, and recreational facilities for its residents.

new town

n
(Human Geography) (in Britain) a town that has been planned as a complete unit and built with government sponsorship, esp to accommodate overspill population

new′ town`


n.
(sometimes caps.) a planned urban community that combines residential, commercial, and recreational areas.
[1915–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.new town - a planned urban community created in a rural or undeveloped area and designed to be self-sufficient with its own housing and education and commerce and recreation
populated area, urban area - a geographical area constituting a city or town
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Translations

new town

n (Brit) → nuovo centro urbano (creato con fondi pubblici)
References in classic literature ?
He transformed it into a new town at a rate with which we boys only could keep up, for as fast as he built dams we made rafts to sail in them; he knocked down houses, and there we were crying 'Pilly
But though the new town is to me a glass through which I look at the old, the people I see passing up and down these wynds, sitting, nightcapped, on their barrow-shafts, hobbling in their blacks to church on Sunday, are less those I saw in my childhood than their fathers and mothers who did these things in the same way when my mother was young.
They built a new town about two miles off, convenient to the river--and Old Welmingham, which was never much more than a village, got in time to be deserted.
On the cliff a new town was springing up, with red brick villas round golf links, and a large hotel had recently been opened to cater for the summer visitors; but Philip went there seldom.
But the beauty and regularity of the new town of Edinburgh, its romantic castle and its environs, the most delightful in the world, Arthur's Seat, St.
But in travelling about, out of the large cities - as I have remarked in former parts of these volumes - I was quite oppressed by the prevailing seriousness and melancholy air of business: which was so general and unvarying, that at every new town I came to, I seemed to meet the very same people whom I had left behind me, at the last.
It stands, I am convinced, upon the ruins of ancient Berlin, the one time capital of the old German empire, but except for the old building material used in the new town there is no sign of the former city.
There were, he said, six in the cartload which he took from Carfax and left at 197 Chicksand Street, Mile End New Town, and another six which he deposited at Jamaica Lane, Bermondsey.
This Gloucester was a new town in a new land, and he purposed to "take it in," as of old he had taken in all the cities from Snohomish to San Diego of that world whence he hailed.
That is evident," I replied; "and for the sake of archaeologists let us hope that these excavations will be made sooner or later, when new towns are established on the isthmus, after the construction of the Suez Canal; a canal, however, very useless to a vessel like the Nautilus.
In the following year, 1881, twelve hundred new towns and cities were marked on the telephone map, and the first dividends were paid --$178,500.
Gentlemen, my uncle walked on with his thumbs in his waistcoat pockets, taking the middle of the street to himself, and singing, now a verse of a love song, and then a verse of a drinking one, and when he was tired of both, whistling melodiously, until he reached the North Bridge, which, at this point, connects the old and new towns of Edinburgh.