newest


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new

 (no͞o, nyo͞o)
adj. new·er, new·est
1. Having been made or come into being only a short time ago; recent: a new law.
2.
a. Still fresh: a new coat of paint.
b. Never used or worn before now: a new car; a new hat.
3. Just found, discovered, or learned: new information.
4. Not previously experienced or encountered; novel or unfamiliar: ideas new to her.
5. Different from the former or the old: the new morality.
6. Recently obtained or acquired: new political power; new money.
7. Additional; further: new sources of energy.
8. Recently arrived or established in a place, position, or relationship: new neighbors; a new president.
9. Changed for the better; rejuvenated: The nap has made a new person of me.
10. Being the later or latest in a sequence: a new edition.
11. Currently fashionable: a new dance.
12. New In the most recent form, period, or development.
13. Inexperienced or unaccustomed: new at the job; new to the trials of parenthood.
14. Of or relating to a new moon.
adv.
Freshly; recently. Often used in combination: new-mown.

[Middle English newe, from Old English nīwe, nēowe; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

new′ness n.
Synonyms: new, fresh, novel2, original
These adjectives describe what has existed for only a short time, has only lately come into use, or has only recently arrived at a state or position, as of prominence. New is the most general: a new movie; a new friend; a new opportunity.
Something fresh has qualities of newness such as briskness, brightness, or purity: fresh footprints in the snow; fresh hope of discovering a vaccine.
Novel applies to the new and strikingly unusual: "His sermons were considered bold in thought and novel in language" (Edith Wharton).
Something that is original is novel and the first of its kind: "The science of pure mathematics, in its modern development, may claim to be the most original creation of the human spirit" (Alfred North Whitehead).
References in classic literature ?
In the sixteenth century we Tuscans made the morning: we had the newest steel, the newest carving, the newest chemistry.
The bands conceived the idea of stirring her soldierly heart with a farewell which would remain in her memory always, beautiful and unfading, and bring back the past and its love for her whenever she should think of it; so they got their project placed before General Burnaby, my successor, who is Cathy's newest slave, and in spite of poverty of precedents they got his permission.
Yes, I reckon yours is the cleanest house, because it's the newest, so you'll just step out and let us knock in one o' the gables, and clap it on to the saloon, and make ONE house of it, don't you see?
You ask the portier at what hours the trains leave--he tells you instantly; or you ask him who is the best physician in town; or what is the hack tariff; or how many children the mayor has; or what days the galleries are open, and whether a permit is required, and where you are to get it, and what you must pay for it; or when the theaters open and close, what the plays are to be, and the price of seats; or what is the newest thing in hats; or how the bills of mortality average; or "who struck Billy Patterson.
Gardiner's business on her arrival was to distribute her presents and describe the newest fashions.
Even the newest of the docks, the Tilbury Dock, shares in the glamour conferred by historical associations.
If we unite both these kinds of history, as is done by the newest historians, we shall have the history of monarchs and writers, but not the history of the life of the peoples.
I have spoken before of Longfellow as one of my first passions, and I have never ceased to delight in him; but some of the very newest and youngest of our poets have given me thrills of happiness, for which life has become lastingly sweeter.
Darnell, his newest mother, lived in Cleveland, Ohio.
When Charles left Ducie Street he had caught the first train home, but had no inkling of the newest development until late at night.
The hotel of the provincial town where Nikolay Levin was lying ill was one of those provincial hotels which are constructed on the newest model of modern improvements, with the best intentions of cleanliness, comfort, and even elegance, but owing to the public that patronizes them, are with astounding rapidity transformed into filthy taverns with a pretension of modern improvement that only makes them worse than the old-fashioned, honestly filthy hotels.
This effect of the volume, for the eye, would have made it, as presumably the newest French novel--and evidently, from the attitude of the reader, "good"--consort happily with the special tone of the room, a consistent air of selection and suppression, one of the finer aesthetic evolutions.