newfangle


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newfangle

(ˈnjuːˈfæŋɡəl)
n
a newfangled thing
adj
a variant form of newfangled
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Conversely, the Vice may also laugh at the misfortune of others; for example, in Like Will to Like Nichol Newfangle laughs at his deception of Philip Fleming and Hance (566) and again when Pierce Pickpurs and Cutbert Cutpurs are taken away to be hanged by Hankin Hangman (1168).
NICHOL NEWFANGLE I will salt thee and hang thee in the shrouds.
The name Nichol Newfangle in Like Will to Like links this Vice to the other type-characters in the play, such as Pierce Pickpurs, and distinguishes him from the personifications, such as Honour.
(27) The only Vice with a name that is not properly conceptual in my corpus is Nichol Newfangle in Like Will to Like.
1490-1500), Iniquity in King Darius (1564-5)) and suggesting his difference from the more narrowly conceived allegorical figures by allowing the negativity of the name to shade into a more frivolous register through rhyme or alliteration (Hardydardy in Godly Queen Hester (1529-30), Nichol Newfangle in Like Will to Like (c.
In Like Will to Like (1562-8), (21) Nichol Newfangle the Vice offers Tom Tosspot and Rafe Roister lands of St.
By doing this as part of the joke he is playing on them, Nichol Newfangle acts out justice, and the audience will laugh together with the Vice at the stupidity of the ruffians.
At the end of the same play, Nichol Newfangle is carried out on the Devil's back, and he bids merry farewell to the audience, and speaks of his return: "Farewell, my masters, till I come again, / For now I must make a journey into Spain." (23) The beauty of these lines I see as the way the Vice makes the play open-ended and at the same time presents himself as somebody who transcends the confines of a single play.
He stresses the miseries Nichol Newfangle has brought on the characters of the play in order to remove him from the merely jovial side of his role.
This measure of music is syllabically set and brings to mind the setting of the jingle tune assigned to the Vice Nicol Newfangle in Ulpian Fulwell's contemporary interlude Like Will to Like.
In Ulpian Fulwell's Like Will to Like (printed 1568), the Vice Nicol Newfangle sings a scored jingle ('Trim Merchandise, Trim, Trim').