newspaperman

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news·pa·per·man

 (no͞oz′pā′pər-măn′, nyo͞oz′-)
n.
1. A man who owns or publishes a newspaper.
2. A man who is a newspaper reporter, writer, or editor.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

newspaperman

(ˈnjuːzˌpeɪpəˌmæn)
n, pl -men
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a man who works for a newspaper as a reporter or editor
2. (Journalism & Publishing) the male owner or proprietor of a newspaper
3. (Journalism & Publishing) a man who sells newspapers in the street
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

news•pa•per•man

(ˈnuzˌpeɪ pərˌmæn, ˈnyuz-, ˈnus-, ˈnyus-)

n., pl. -men.
1. a person employed by a newspaper or wire service as a reporter, writer, or editor.
2. the owner or operator of a newspaper or news service.
[1800–10]
usage: See -man.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.newspaperman - a journalist employed to provide news stories for newspapers or broadcast medianewspaperman - a journalist employed to provide news stories for newspapers or broadcast media
foreign correspondent - a journalist who sends news reports and commentary from a foreign country for publication or broadcast
journalist - a writer for newspapers and magazines
war correspondent - a journalist who sends news reports and commentary from a combat zone or place of battle for publication or broadcast
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

newspaperman

[ˈnjuːzˌpeɪpəmæn] N (newspapermen (pl)) → periodista m, reportero m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

newspaperman

[ˈnjuːzˌpeɪpəmən] n (-men (pl)) → giornalista m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
That's how the two former newspaperwomen christened their new full-color glossy magazine based in their hometown.
She helped lift community newspaper editing to the level of art, and in doing so became known as the dean of prairie newspaperwomen. Some likened her to the singular Bob Edwards, himself a one-time newspaper editor in High River.
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By associating Progressive Era newspaperwomen with queerness, I do not mean to suggest that they would have identified as or understood themselves to be lesbians (or inverts, a term more common at the time).
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A doctoral student at the University of Texas posed that question and others in a national online survey of current and former newspaperwomen.