newsperson


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news·per·son

 (no͞oz′pûr′sən, nyo͞oz′-)
n.
A newsman or a newswoman.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

newsperson

(ˈnjuːzˌpɜːsən)
n
(Communications & Information) a newsman or woman
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

news•per•son

(ˈnuzˌpɜr sən, ˈnyuz-)

n.
a person employed to gather, report, or broadcast news.
[1970–75]
usage: See -person.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.newsperson - a person who investigates and reports or edits news storiesnewsperson - a person who investigates and reports or edits news stories
communicator - a person who communicates with others
newswoman - a female newsperson
television newscaster, television reporter, TV newsman, TV reporter - someone who reports news stories via television
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If a privileged information distributor told a newsperson that he could have a scoop for the asking the latter would not consider it necessary to check the correctness of the story before rushing to release it, and if he ran into trouble he might not be able to name his source.
Must we have to endure such 'off-shoulder' and 'off-putting' sights, just because a TV newsperson thinks she has a lissome neck and lovely clavicle that the entire nation should admire and adore.
RBR+TVBR observation: I include this because what a rarity it is for a radio newsperson to have had such longevity with one employer.
Brian Williams' trauma should be a wake-up call to every anchor and newsperson who so desperately seeks attention as "more'' than a mere reader of news.
<![CDATA[ Veteran newsperson Helen Thomas of Hearst told <br/>Jews to get the hell out of Palestine.
Subject to ratification by the union membership, the pay raise would be effective March 2, bringing the minimum weekly salary for an experienced newsperson to $1,193.40; the minimum weekly salary for an experienced technician would go to $946.04.
This way the reader, or the viewer, continues to trust the professional reporting of the newsperson, or the publisher, and separately gets to read, or hear, their personal point of view.
The examples range in style from a resume for a young person seeking experience as a caregiver, to an aspiring newsperson, an inventor-in-training, and much more.
If I could have another career, I would love to work in radio, as a disc jockey, newsperson or whatever.
But I applaud any TV newsperson who refuses to leave the studio.
Does any newsperson ever consider that some accused priests might actually be innocent?
In an unrelated incident, a local newsperson was interviewing a CG official about a tanker that had leaked a small amount of oil into Boston Harbor.