newsroom

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news·room

 (no͞oz′ro͞om′, -ro͝om′, nyo͞oz′-)
n.
A room, as in a newspaper office or radio or television station, where news stories are written and edited.

newsroom

(ˈnjuːzˌruːm; -ˌrʊm)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) a room in a newspaper office or television or radio station, where news is received and prepared for publication or broadcasting

news′room`

or news′ room`,



n.
an office, as of a newspaper or broadcasting organization, in which the news is processed.
[1810–20]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.newsroom - the staff of a newspaper or the news department of a periodicalnewsroom - the staff of a newspaper or the news department of a periodical; "every newspaper editor is criticized by the newsroom"
staff - personnel who assist their superior in carrying out an assigned task; "the hospital has an excellent nursing staff"; "the general relied on his staff to make routine decisions"
2.newsroom - an office in which news is processed by a newspaper or news agency or television or radio station
business office, office - place of business where professional or clerical duties are performed; "he rented an office in the new building"
3.newsroom - a reading room (in a library or club) where newspapers and other periodicals can be read
reading room - a room set aside for reading
Translations

newsroom

[ˈnjuːzrʊm] Nsala f de redacción

newsroom

[ˈnjuːzruːm] n (PRESS, RADIO, TV)salle f de rédaction

newsroom

[ˈnjuːzˌrʊm] nredazione f
References in periodicals archive ?
We will only need two people to run an entire news show, compared to the usual five or six in other newsrooms.
From typewriters to computers, reporters to data journalists, today's newsrooms are undergoing a transformation.
It involves 180 users running on Windows platforms to support the Turkish national broadcaster's multiple TV channels and newsrooms.
So, stand by for some robust competition between newsrooms, as well as a renewed spirit of cooperation in the back office.
The goal was to combine high ideals with hands-on application and to bring this new programming directly into newsrooms around the country.
The moral issues of Saddam Hussein's tyrannical rule and the ensuing debate over Iraq's production and possession of weapons of mass destruction effectively became points of academic argument in the newsrooms.
Shalit was tackling one of the thorniest topics in newsrooms in America.
Initiatives to diversify newsrooms across the country have registered small gains in helping minorities obtain careers in print journalism.
Though strides have been made, the report, the only one of its kind, recognizes the lack of parity that still exists among managers within television newsrooms.
Staff members in both newsrooms were offered voluntary buyouts, but if not enough people take them there will be layoffs before the Sept.
In 2004, the ASNE survey showed that of the approximately 54,200 professionals working in newsrooms, some 13 percent are minorities.