newton


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

new·ton

 (no͞ot′n, nyo͞ot′n)
n. Abbr. N
The SI-derived unit of force required to accelerate a mass of one kilogram one meter per second per second, equal to 100,000 dynes. See Table at measurement.

[After Sir Isaac Newton.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

newton

(ˈnjuːtən)
n
(Units) the derived SI unit of force that imparts an acceleration of 1 metre per second to a mass of 1 kilogram; equivalent to 105 dynes or 7.233 poundals. Symbol: N
[C20: named after Sir Isaac Newton]

Newton

(ˈnjuːtən)
n
(Astronomy) one of the deepest craters on the moon, over 7300 m deep and about 112 km in diameter, situated in the SE quadrant

Newton

(ˈnjuːtən)
n
(Biography) Sir Isaac. 1642–1727, English mathematician, physicist, astronomer, and philosopher, noted particularly for his law of gravitation, his three laws of motion, his theory that light is composed of corpuscles, and his development of calculus independently of Leibnitz. His works include Principia Mathematica (1687) and Opticks (1704)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

new•ton

(ˈnut n, ˈnyut n)

n.
the SI unit of force, equal to the force that produces an acceleration of one meter per second per second on a mass of one kilogram.
[1900–05; after I. Newton]

New•ton

(ˈnut n, ˈnyut n)

n.
1. Sir Isaac, 1642–1727, English physicist and mathematician.
2. a city in E Massachusetts, near Boston. 82,230.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

new·ton

(no͞ot′n)
A unit used to measure force. One newton is equal to the force needed to accelerate a mass of one kilogram one meter per second per second.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

newton

1. The unit of force giving a mass of 1 kg an acceleration of about 1 m per second per second.
2. (N) A unit of force which, when applied, accelerates a mass of one kilogram by one meter per second per second. This unit has replaced the dyne: 1 N = 105 dynes. Named after Isaac Newton (1642–1727).
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.newton - English mathematician and physicistNewton - English mathematician and physicist; remembered for developing the calculus and for his law of gravitation and his three laws of motion (1642-1727)
2.newton - a unit of force equal to the force that imparts an acceleration of 1 m/sec/sec to a mass of 1 kilogram; equal to 100,000 dynes
force unit - a unit of measurement of physical force
dyne - a unit of force equal to the force that imparts an acceleration of 1 cm/sec/sec to a mass of 1 gram
sthene - a unit of force equal to 1000 newtons
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
njutn
ニュートン
niuton
newton

newton

[ˈnjuːtn] Nnewton m, neutonio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Alderman Ptolemy Tortoise and Sir Isaac Newton. The Alderman, however, eats salad."
SIR ISAAC NEWTON wore his black and gold waistcoat,
"What's it about, Tom?" asked his chum, Ned Newton. "Something about inside baseball, or a new submarine that can be converted into an airship on short notice?"
Oh, yes, now I remember him," said Ned Newton. "But what has he got to do with a wonderful story?
But just as the force of gravitation, incomprehensible in itself but felt by every man, is understood by us only to the extent to which we know the laws of inevitability to which it is subject (from the first knowledge that all bodies have weight, up to Newton's law), so too the force of free will, incomprehensible in itself but of which everyone is conscious, is intelligible to us only in as far as we know the laws of inevitability to which it is subject (from the fact that every man dies, up to the knowledge of the most complex economic and historic laws).
How this young Newton (for such I judge him to be) came by his information, I don't know; he was a quarter of a century too young to know anything about it of himself.
This name was given to the high grounds in the north, east part of Newton, and to the bounds of that town and Watertown.
Pertaining to a philosophy of the universe invented by Newton, who discovered that an apple will fall to the ground, but was unable to say why.
"It is for that reason I am delighted to see you," continued the abbe, "although you have disturbed me in a most important calculation, which, if it succeeded, would possibly change Newton's system.
Some seconds of a Pascal or a Newton are more precious than the whole existence of a crowd of raw simpletons "
Newton and Laplace need myriads of age and thick-strewn celestial areas.
Consider, here are the two Miss Careys come over from Newton, the three Miss Dashwoods walked up from the cottage, and Mr.