nextness

nextness

(ˈnɛkstnəs)
n
(Philosophy) the condition of being next, adjacency
References in periodicals archive ?
(Even the word "family," not in the poem, can dissolve historically into the word "familiar," which means, if we read the world's dialogues in the light of Inquisition, a coercive pseudo-"friend" who reports back to the inquisitors.) The proximity or, to use a plainer word, nextness of the two dead ones gives her the only group she has.
In what follows, my argument is that it is fruitless to seek the nextness of new media, and the future of scholarship it carries with it, in anamnesis, in that regress of techne--nostos--physis, to a nature conceived as foil for self-organized cyborganization.
Twain's incorrigible hero does not develop any intimate participatory closeness or even obviously sympathetic nextness to the natural world; he simply will not merge with the landscape, either with the immediate scenery or with some ultimate territory, nor is he ever likely to fantastically fall/slip through a rabbit hole.
The sudden or jerky motions or rhythms along with the abrupt and prolonged pauses characteristic of Davis' music could be appreciated with regard to how often they tend to empty his music of certain "conventionally real" things or predictable flow that "metonymizes" the music with a kind of soothing, smooth, and sweet "nextness" to reveal the bare fullness or naked emptiness.
phrasal structures, left dislocation, repair, and "nextness."
T.M.: The willing indeterminancy of your poetics, the provisionality you were just speaking of and have written of - "nextness," revisionist approaches to genre, the paradoxical openness of the most generous closure - I understand these as profound gestures of humility.