niceness


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nice

 (nīs)
adj. nic·er, nic·est
1. Pleasing and agreeable in nature: had a nice time; a nice person.
2. Having a pleasant or attractive appearance: a nice dress; a nice face.
3. Exhibiting courtesy and politeness: a nice gesture.
4. Of good character and reputation; respectable.
5. Overdelicate or fastidious; fussy.
6. Showing or requiring great precision or sensitive discernment; subtle: a nice distinction; a nice sense of style.
7. Done with delicacy and skill: a nice bit of craft.
8. Used as an intensive with and: nice and warm.
9. Obsolete
a. Wanton; profligate: "For when mine hours / Were nice and lucky, men did ransom lives / Of me for jests" (Shakespeare).
b. Affectedly modest; coy: "Ere ... / The nice Morn on th' Indian steep, / From her cabin'd loop-hole peep" (John Milton).

[Middle English, foolish, from Old French, from Latin nescius, ignorant, from nescīre, to be ignorant; see nescience.]

nice′ly adv.
nice′ness n.

Nice

 (nēs)
A city of southeast France on the Mediterranean Sea northeast of Cannes. Controlled by various royal houses after the 1200s, the city was finally ceded to France in 1860. It is the leading resort city of the French Riviera.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.niceness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usageniceness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usage
good manners, courtesy - a courteous manner
2.niceness - the quality of nice
pleasantness, sweetness - the quality of giving pleasure; "he was charmed by the sweetness of her manner"; "the pleasantness of a cool breeze on a hot summer day"
nastiness - the quality of being unpleasant; "I flinched at the nastiness of his wound"
3.niceness - the quality of being difficult to detect or analyze; "you had to admire the subtlety of the distinctions he drew"
difficultness, difficulty - the quality of being difficult; "they agreed about the difficulty of the climb"

niceness

noun kindness, charm, goodness, decency, friendliness, amiability, pleasantness, agreeableness, likableness or likeableness I think it was Joe's niceness and kindness that attracted me.
Translations

niceness

[ˈnaɪsnɪs] N
1. (= pleasantness) [of place, thing] → lo agradable
2. (= likeableness) [of person] → simpatía f
3. (= kindness) → amabilidad f
4. (= politeness) → finura f
5. (= subtlety) → sutileza f

niceness

[ˈnaɪsnɪs] n [person] → gentillesse f

niceness

n
(= pleasantness: of person, behaviour) → Nettigkeit f; (= nice appearance)nettes or hübsches Aussehen; (= skilfulness)Qualität f, → Feinheit f
(= subtlety)Feinheit f, → Genauigkeit f
(= fastidiousness)anspruchsvolle Art, Pingeligkeit f (inf), → Heikelkeit f (dial)
References in classic literature ?
Nay, Seneca adds niceness and satiety: Cogita quamdiu eadem feceris; mori velle, non tantum fortis aut miser, sed etiam fastidiosus potest.
His host's contemptuous tribute to May's "niceness" was just what a husband should have wished to hear said of his wife.
In former years Paulvitch had been a fastidious scoundrel; but ten years of hideous life among the cannibals of Africa had eradicated the last vestige of niceness from his habits.
They were not worldly young fellows, but fraternizing with dairy-folk would have struck unpleasantly upon their biassed niceness, apart from their view of the match.
Almost unconsciously she had now undone the parcel he had just put into her hand, and seeing before her, in all the niceness of jewellers' packing, a plain gold chain, perfectly simple and neat, she could not help bursting forth again, "Oh, this is beautiful indeed!
Bird-like in her love of individual freedom, the last woman in the world to be bullied in her affections, she keenly appreciated the niceness of his attitude.
To his mother it perhaps appeared as a marriage to some lady of means who could not resist her boy's niceness. Fancy her feelings when he married a flower girl who had become declassee under extraordinary circumstances which were now notorious!
To her amazement she found that some "quite nice" people were saturated with Wells, and that this accessibility to ideas was the secret of their niceness. People she had thought deeply religious, and had tried to conciliate on that tack with disastrous results, suddenly took an interest in her, and revealed a hostility to conventional religion which she had never conceived possible except among the most desperate characters.
"One doesn't come to Italy for niceness," was the retort; "one comes for life.
I affect no niceness of conscience--I have not found any nice standards necessary yet to measure your actions by, sir.
People tapped their feet in time with the tunes, no-one got offended or upset but for all this 'niceness' The Somethings (writer's block when thinking of a name, perhaps?) just didn't have enough bite.
But we're hoping that if we can start a general movement to treat copyrights with a little bit of extra niceness, the Web and the Net will be better places for us all.