niche

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niche

 (nĭch, nēsh)
n.
1. A recess in a wall, as for holding a statue or urn.
2. A cranny, hollow, or crevice, as in rock.
3.
a. A situation or activity specially suited to a person's interests, abilities, or nature: found her niche in life.
b. A special area of demand for a product or service: "One niche that is approaching mass-market proportions is held by regional magazines" (Brad Edmondson).
4. Ecology
a. The function or position of an organism or population within an ecological community.
b. The range of environmental conditions within which the members of a given species can survive and reproduce.
tr.v. niched, nich·ing, nich·es
To place in a niche.

[French, from Old French, from nichier, to nest (from Vulgar Latin *nīdicāre, from Latin nīdus, nest; see sed- in Indo-European roots) or from Old Italian nicchio, seashell (perhaps from Latin mītulus, mussel).]
Usage Note: Niche was borrowed from French in the 1600s and Anglicized shortly thereafter. Many French borrowings have troublesome pronunciations, because most English speakers can't speak French very well, if at all. Niche presents an interesting variation of this pattern. It was quickly converted into a comfortable English-sounding word, pronounced (nĭch) and rhyming with itch. But in the 1900s, people familiar with French thought that a word that looked French should sound French, and so the Francophone pronunciation (nēsh), rhyming with quiche, was revived. Some Americans consider this pronunciation to be an affectation; however, it is standard in Britain and is included in most American dictionaries. The hybrid pronunciation (nēch), which takes something from each version to rhyme with leech, is less favored, perhaps because it makes one look as though one doesn't know what language one is speaking. In our 2005 survey, 69 percent of the Usage Panel found it unacceptable.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

niche

(nɪtʃ; niːʃ)
n
1. (Architecture) a recess in a wall, esp one that contains a statue
2. (Mountaineering) any similar recess, such as one in a rock face
3. a position particularly suitable for the person occupying it: he found his niche in politics.
4. (Commerce) (modifier) relating to or aimed at a small specialized group or market
5. (Biology) ecology the role of a plant or animal within its community and habitat, which determines its activities, relationships with other organisms, etc
vb
(tr) to place (a statue) in a niche; ensconce (oneself)
[C17: from French, from Old French nichier to nest, from Vulgar Latin nīdicāre (unattested) to build a nest, from Latin nīdus nest]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

niche

(nɪtʃ)

n., v. niched, nich•ing. n.
1. a recess in a wall or the like, usu. semicircular in plan and arched, as for a statue.
2. a suitable place or position: to find one's niche in the world.
3. the position and function of a particular species or population in an ecological community.
4. a distinct segment of a market.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to a market niche: niche advertising.
v.t.
6. to place in a niche.
[1605–15; < French, Middle French, n. derivative of nicher to make a nest < Vulgar Latin *nīdiculāre, v. derivative of Latin nīdus nest]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

niche

(nĭch, nēsh)
The function or position of a species within an ecological community. A species's niche includes the physical environment to which it has become adapted as well as its role as producer and consumer of food resources.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

niche


Past participle: niched
Gerund: niching

Imperative
niche
niche
Present
I niche
you niche
he/she/it niches
we niche
you niche
they niche
Preterite
I niched
you niched
he/she/it niched
we niched
you niched
they niched
Present Continuous
I am niching
you are niching
he/she/it is niching
we are niching
you are niching
they are niching
Present Perfect
I have niched
you have niched
he/she/it has niched
we have niched
you have niched
they have niched
Past Continuous
I was niching
you were niching
he/she/it was niching
we were niching
you were niching
they were niching
Past Perfect
I had niched
you had niched
he/she/it had niched
we had niched
you had niched
they had niched
Future
I will niche
you will niche
he/she/it will niche
we will niche
you will niche
they will niche
Future Perfect
I will have niched
you will have niched
he/she/it will have niched
we will have niched
you will have niched
they will have niched
Future Continuous
I will be niching
you will be niching
he/she/it will be niching
we will be niching
you will be niching
they will be niching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been niching
you have been niching
he/she/it has been niching
we have been niching
you have been niching
they have been niching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been niching
you will have been niching
he/she/it will have been niching
we will have been niching
you will have been niching
they will have been niching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been niching
you had been niching
he/she/it had been niching
we had been niching
you had been niching
they had been niching
Conditional
I would niche
you would niche
he/she/it would niche
we would niche
you would niche
they would niche
Past Conditional
I would have niched
you would have niched
he/she/it would have niched
we would have niched
you would have niched
they would have niched
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.niche - a position particularly well suited to the person who occupies it; "he found his niche in the academic world"
station, place - proper or designated social situation; "he overstepped his place"; "the responsibilities of a man in his station"; "married above her station"
2.niche - a small concavity
pharyngeal recess - a small recess in the wall of the pharynx
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
3.niche - an enclosure that is set back or indented
alcove, bay - a small recess opening off a larger room
apse, apsis - a domed or vaulted recess or projection on a building especially the east end of a church; usually contains the altar
cinerarium, columbarium - a niche for a funeral urn containing the ashes of the cremated dead
enclosure - a structure consisting of an area that has been enclosed for some purpose
fireplace, hearth, open fireplace - an open recess in a wall at the base of a chimney where a fire can be built; "the fireplace was so large you could walk inside it"; "he laid a fire in the hearth and lit it"; "the hearth was black with the charcoal of many fires"
mihrab - (Islam) a niche in the wall of a mosque that indicates the direction of Mecca
4.niche - (ecology) the status of an organism within its environment and community (affecting its survival as a species)
bionomics, environmental science, ecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

niche

noun
1. recess, opening, corner, hollow, nook, alcove There was a niche in the rock where the path ended.
2. position, calling, place, slot (informal), vocation, pigeonhole (informal) Perhaps I will find my niche in a desk job.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

niche

noun
The proper or designated location:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مِشْكاه، فَجْوَة في جِدارمَكان مُلائِم
místečkonikapevné místo
niche
sess, rétt hillaveggskot
tinkama vieta
īsta/piemērota vietaniša
nikavhodné miesto
duvar girintisinişuygun yer

niche

[niːʃ] N (Archit) → nicho m, hornacina f (fig) → hueco m
to find a niche for o.shacerse con una buena posición or un huequito
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

niche

[ˈniːʃ] n
(in wall)niche f
(in market)niche f, créneau m
to find a niche in the market → trouver une niche sur le marché
(for person)créneau m
to find one's niche → trouver son créneau
to carve a niche for o.s. → se trouver un créneauniche market ncréneau m
a profitable niche market → un créneau rentable
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

niche

n (Archit) → Nische f; (fig)Plätzchen nt; to carve a niche for oneselfeine Nische für sich finden; niche market (Comm) → Nischenmarkt m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

niche

[niːʃ] n (Archit) → nicchia (Ecology) → nicchia ecologica (fig) to find a niche for o.s.trovare una propria collocazione
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

niche

(nitʃ) , (niːʃ) noun
1. a hollow in a wall for a statue, ornament etc.
2. a suitable place in life. He found his niche in engineering.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

niche

n. nicho, depresión o defecto pequeño esp. en la pared de un órgano hueco.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Three important things are to-day lacking in that façade: in the first place, the staircase of eleven steps which formerly raised it above the soil; next, the lower series of statues which occupied the niches of the three portals; and lastly the upper series, of the twenty-eight most ancient kings of France, which garnished the gallery of the first story, beginning with Childebert, and ending with Phillip Augustus, holding in his hand "the imperial apple."
But, not to detract from a nation, to which, during my life, I shall acknowledge myself extremely obliged, it must be allowed, that whatever this famous tower wants in height, is amply made up in beauty and strength: for the walls are near a hundred feet thick, built of hewn stone, whereof each is about forty feet square, and adorned on all sides with statues of gods and emperors, cut in marble, larger than the life, placed in their several niches. I measured a little finger which had fallen down from one of these statues, and lay unperceived among some rubbish, and found it exactly four feet and an inch in length.
Although the hall porter saw someone's carriage standing at the entrance, after scrutinizing the mother and son (who without asking to be announced had passed straight through the glass porch between the rows of statues in niches) and looking significantly at the lady's old cloak, he asked whether they wanted the count or the princesses, and, hearing that they wished to see the count, said his excellency was worse today, and that his excellency was not receiving anyone.
Were there to be any niches after all in the temple of happiness to which he could never climb?
Here she drew back one of the hangings, revealing a little niche behind, into which she shoved the Englishman and dropped the hangings before him, effectually hiding him from observation from the rooms beyond.
In the third story, or guard-chamber, is a small recess with a loop-hole, probably a bedchamber, and in that floor above a niche for a saint or holy-water pot.
In an instant he had reached the extremity of the niche, and finding his progress arrested by the rock, stood stupidly bewildered.
The erudite gentleman in whom I confided congealed before I was half through!--it is all that saved him from exploding--and my dreams of an Honorary Fellowship, gold medals, and a niche in the Hall of Fame faded into the thin, cold air of his arctic atmosphere.
And with her madness came visions, for she dreamed that the dead One whom Galazi had told her of sat once more aloft in his niche at the end of the cave and spoke to her, saying:--
Mimi, trying to keep as far from him as possible, moved across the stone floor of the turret roof, and found a niche which concealed her.
On the first landing, which was as small as the necessary turn of the stairs allowed, there was a niche in the column, about half a yard wide, and in this niche the prince felt convinced that a man stood concealed.
As the deep Cathedral-bell strikes the hour, a ripple of wind goes through these at their distance, like a ripple of the solemn sound that hums through tomb and tower, broken niche and defaced statue, in the pile close at hand.