nick-nack


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

nick-nack

(ˈnɪkˌnæk)
n
a variant spelling of knick-knack
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
From each side of the saddle hangs an esquimoot, a sort of pocket, in which she bestows the residue of her trinkets and nick-nacks, which cannot be crowded on the decoration of her horse or herself.
"I'll have no clumsy beasts enter my palace, to overturn and break all my pretty nick-nacks. When the rest of your friends are transformed you can return to the upper world, and go about your business."
Sheep nick-nack: 1 Jean Gemmell; 2 Enid Graham; 3 Irene Young.
First he works at the town's only tavern, the Nick-Nack, and then he owns it.
At the Cheltenham Superstore, nobody judges you and you can pick up a nick-nack or two to divert the attention, like a pounds 50 set of wooden ducks called AP, Ruby and Dickie - without which no home can ever call itself complete - a Big Buck's T-shirt replete with irritating grammatical error that could inflict serious psychological damage on the more pedantic wearer, or a copy of Horses In Training 2012, which seemed a little unseasonable to say the least.
There are scores of little restaurants and specialist delicatessens and nick-nack shops.
In which Bond film was Nick-Nack the villain's sidekick?
The double cab has plenty of room for five people and there should be space for all their belongings with ample nick-nack storage.
Well, the expanded dimensions mean the double cab has plenty of room for five and there should be space for all their paraphernalia with ample nick-nack storage, including two glove boxes and a covered tray on the dash, a total of five cup holders and bottle holders in the front doors.
The city has all the big high street names as well as wealth of independent cafes, chocolate shops and nick-nack stores, all located on some of the country's oldest shopping parades.
Perhaps this means we can get another nick-nack for the mantelpiece or another cardigan for Granny.'
This old man, he played one, he played nick-nack on my...