nidus


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ni·dus

 (nī′dəs)
n. pl. ni·dus·es or ni·di (-dī)
1. A central point or focus of infection by bacteria or other pathogens.
2. A point or place at which something originates, accumulates, or develops, such as the center around which a calculus forms.

[Latin nīdus; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

nidus

(ˈnaɪdəs)
n, pl -di (-daɪ)
1. (Zoology) the nest in which insects or spiders deposit their eggs
2. (Pathology) pathol a focus of infection
3. (Botany) a cavity in which plant spores develop
[C18: from Latin nest]
ˈnidal adj

ni•dus

(ˈnaɪ dəs)

n., pl. -di (-dī).
1. a nest, esp. one in which insects, spiders, etc., deposit their eggs.
2. any focal point in the body where bacteria or other infectious organisms tend to thrive.
[1735–45; < Latin nīdus nest]
ni′dal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nidus - a central point or locus of an infection in an organismnidus - a central point or locus of an infection in an organism; "the focus of infection"
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
focal infection - bacterial infection limited to a specific organ or region especially one causing symptoms elsewhere
2.nidus - a nest in which spiders or insects deposit their eggs
nest - a structure in which animals lay eggs or give birth to their young
wasp's nest, wasps' nest, hornet's nest, hornets' nest - habitation for wasps or hornets
Translations

ni·dus

n. nido.
References in classic literature ?
Certain seeds which are required to find a nidus for themselves under unfavorable circumstances have been supplied by nature with an apparatus of hooks, so that they will get a hold on very unreceptive surfaces.
If this be hypocrisy, it is a process which shows itself occasionally in us all, to whatever confession we belong, and whether we believe in the future perfection of our race or in the nearest date fixed for the end of the world; whether we regard the earth as a putrefying nidus for a saved remnant, including ourselves, or have a passionate belief in the solidarity of mankind.
This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that 1) reporting of HIV status among TB patients increased from 35% in 1993 to 68% in 2003, 2) HIV status of 31% of TB patients was unknown in 2005, 3) 9% of TB patients were HIV positive in 2005, and 4) groups of TB patients at greater risk for HIV infection included injection-drug users (IDUs), noninjection-drug users (NIDUs), homeless persons, non-Hispanic blacks, correctional-facility inmates, and alcohol abusers.
Once incorporated into the subendothelial space, monocytes and T cells can create an inflammatory nidus and promote cell proliferation and migration, early events in atherogenesis and neointimalization.
Nidus Festival: August 4th-6th, Bingeman Park, Kitchener, Ont.
Anglican youth are expected to be part of Nidus, a three-day festival where people "from all streams of Christian faith" will gather for music, worship, drama and dance in Kitchener, Ont., on Aug.
For a shady location, go for asple-nium nidus or bird's nest fern.
As I remember, intestinal survival is relatively short, but Salmonellae can establish a nidus in the gallbladder and survive there for many years.
This injury is believed to induce the proliferation of smooth muscle cells and the elaboration of extracellular collagen, which leads to progressive stenosis and obliteration of the nidus. Once thrombosis of the arteriovenous malformation is achieved, the absence of blood flow through the lesion eliminates the risk of hemorrhage (Steiner, L., Payne, Dheerendra, & Steiner, M., 2000).
Instead of a nidus cell reaction of the mononuclear type, there were diffuse accumulations of analogous cells.
Living in perpetual dread during the sadism-infused Stalin-Rakosi era, she nevertheless kept a secret diary (the book's nidus), registering how those unspeakable horrors happened.