nightdress


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night·dress

 (nīt′drĕs′)
n.
1. See nightgown.
2. See sleepwear.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nightdress

(ˈnaɪtˌdrɛs)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) Brit a loose dress worn in bed by women. Also called: nightgown or nightie
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

night•clothes

(ˈnaɪtˌkloʊz, -ˌkloʊðz)

n.pl.
garments for wearing in bed, as pajamas or nightgowns.
[1595–1605]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nightdress - lingerie consisting of a loose dress designed to be worn in bed by womennightdress - lingerie consisting of a loose dress designed to be worn in bed by women
intimate apparel, lingerie - women's underwear and nightclothes
nightcap - a cloth cap worn in bed
nightclothes, nightwear, sleepwear - garments designed to be worn in bed
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
noční košile
natkjole
yöpaita
spavaćica
hálóing
náttkjóll
ねまき
잠옷
nočná košeľa
spalna srajca
nattlinne
ชุดนอน
váy ngủ

nightdress

[ˈnaɪtdres] N (esp Brit) → camisón m de noche
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nightdress

[ˈnaɪtdrɛs] n (British)chemise f de nuit
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nightdress

[ˈnaɪtˌdrɛs] ncamicia da notte
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

night

(nait) noun
1. the period from sunset to sunrise. We sleep at night; They talked all night (long); He travelled by night and rested during the day; The days were warm and the nights were cool; (also adjective) He is doing night work.
2. the time of darkness. In the Arctic in winter, night lasts for twenty-four hours out of twenty-four.
ˈnightly adjective, adverb
every night. a nightly news programme; He goes there nightly.
ˈnight-club noun
a club open at night for drinking, dancing, entertainment etc.
ˈnightdress, ˈnightgown noun
a garment for wearing in bed.
ˈnightfall noun
the beginning of night; dusk.
ˈnightmare noun
a frightening dream. I had a nightmare about being strangled.
ˈnightmarish adjective
ˈnight-school noun
(a place providing) educational classes held in the evenings for people who are at work during the day.
ˈnight shift
1. (a period of) work during the night. He's on (the) night shift this week.
2. the people who work during this period. We met the night shift leaving the factory.
ˈnight-time noun
the time when it is night. Owls are usually seen at night-time.
ˌnight-ˈwatchman noun
a person who looks after a building etc during the night.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

nightdress

ثَوبُ الْنَّومِ noční košile natkjole Nachthemd νυχτικό camisón yöpaita chemise de nuit spavaćica camicia da notte ねまき 잠옷 nachthemd nattkjole koszula nocna camisa de noite, camisola ночная рубашка nattlinne ชุดนอน gecelik váy ngủ 女睡衣
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
"Thank God," I said to myself, "she cannot be far, as she is only in her nightdress."
As I came close, she put up her hand in her sleep and pulled the collar of her nightdress close around her, as though she felt the cold.
I must have pinched up a piece of loose skin and have transfixed it, for there are two little red points like pin-pricks, and on the band of her nightdress was a drop of blood.
Rebecca never stopped long to think, more 's the pity, so she put on her oldest dress and hat and jacket, then wrapped her nightdress, comb, and toothbrush in a bundle and dropped it softly out of the window.
I alone can save you, and I will." Valentine in the extremity of her terror joined her hands, -- for she felt that the moment had arrived to ask for courage, -- and began to pray, and while uttering little more than incoherent words, she forgot that her white shoulders had no other covering than her long hair, and that the pulsations of her heart could he seen through the lace of her nightdress. Monte Cristo gently laid his hand on the young girl's arm, drew the velvet coverlet close to her throat, and said with a paternal smile, -- "My child, believe in my devotion to you as you believe in the goodness of providence and the love of Maximilian."
The bedroom looked as though she had just left it: the brushes were neatly placed on the toilet-table, one on each side of the comb; someone had smoothed down the bed on which she had spent her last night in the studio; and her nightdress in a little case lay on the pillow.
"Poor 'Narcissa' after death (says Walpole) was attired in a Holland nightdress, with tucker and double ruffles of Brunswick lace, of which latter material she also wore a headdress, and a pair of new kid gloves.
Here is one of Jane Andrews' stories depicting her heroine as sleeping in a beautiful white satin nightdress trimmed with seed pearls."
The window of the room was open, and beside the window, all huddled up, lay the body of a man in his nightdress. He was quite dead, and had been for some time, for his limbs were rigid and cold.
Miss Bordereau stood there in her nightdress, in the doorway of her room, watching me; her hands were raised, she had lifted the everlasting curtain that covered half her face, and for the first, the last, the only time I beheld her extraordinary eyes.
I suppose you felt chilly after walking to and fro in nothing but your nightdress, and put on the warmest thing you could find.
In the drawer behind her at that moment lay two new nightdresses that Milly for months had been vainly urging her mother to wear.