nightshade family


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nightshade family

n.
A family of plants, the Solanaceae, characterized by alternate leaves, usually five-petaled flowers, and many-seeded fruits and including the eggplant, tomato, potato, and belladonna as well as the nightshades, capsicum peppers, tobaccos, and petunias.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It became associated with witchcra and the devil, as it is botanically part of the deadly nightshade family.
The basic families include the cabbage family (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, radishes and turnips); cucumber family (gourds, melons, squashes and cucumbers); nightshade family (eggplant, potatoes, tomatoes and peppers); goosefoot family (spinach and beets); onion family (leeks, garlic and onions); legume family (all peas and beans), and the carrot, celery and parsnip group.
Because potatoes resembled plants from the nightshade family, people were slow to warm up to this nutritious vegetable, so it wasn't until the 1800s that they became a popular food.
A member of the nightshade family, the predominant fear in this remedy is being absolutely alone in the wilds at the mercy of dangerous, wild animals.
The fruit looks like a funny-coloured tomato but in fact it is of the nightshade family bearing small, spherical and green or green-purple fruit of the same name.
The paradoxical attributes of the Nightshade family (Solanaceae) are well known to most vegetable gardeners.
The nightshade family includes tomatoes, tomatillos and ground cherries, both sweet and hot peppers, eggplant and potatoes.
Eggplants belong to the nightshade family of vegetables, which also includes tomatoes, bell peppers, capsicum and potatoes.
The tomato belongs to the nightshade family, Solanaceae.
Lycopersicon esculentum, as the tomato is also known, arrived in Great Britain at the end of the 16th century but was thought poisonous as it was a member of the deadly nightshade family, Solanaceae.
Al Buriami: Specialists at Al Buraimi Municipality inspected the vegetable, fruits and foodstuff sale outlets at the wilaya and dumped 200 kgs of poisonous potatoes after receiving the ministerial circular about the fresh potatoes which include solanine a glycoalkaloid found mainly in nightshade family species like potato and tomato.