ninny

(redirected from ninnies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.
Related to ninnies: numskull, Idiotism, dullard

nin·ny

 (nĭn′ē)
n. pl. nin·nies
A fool; a simpleton.

[Perhaps alteration of innocent.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ninny

(ˈnɪnɪ)
n, pl -nies
a dull-witted person
[C16: perhaps from an innocent simpleton]
ˈninnyish adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nin•ny

(ˈnɪn i)

n., pl. -nies.
a fool or simpleton.
[1585–95; perhaps generic use of pet form of Innocent proper name; see -y2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ninny - a stupid foolish person
simpleton, simple - a person lacking intelligence or common sense
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

ninny

noun
One deficient in judgment and good sense:
Informal: dope, gander, goose.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

ninny

[ˈnɪnɪ] Nbobo/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ninny

n (inf)Dussel m (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ninny

[ˈnɪnɪ] n (fam) → sciocco/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
If I had known, I'd have given you Virgin Mary; you ninnies! And I!
But now, from what little I've seen of them, they strike me as a pack of ninnies, most of them, and ninety percent of the remainder as bores.
Like all nerds, I love Jeopardy, and when I'm not busy obnoxiously shouting my answers at the screen and snickering at those ninnies on TV who fail to respond to obvious clues like "After a demonstration of this, the April 8, 1927, New York Times said, 'Commercial use in doubt'" (the answer, of course, is "Television"), I daydream about my own perfect categories, narrow and verdant fields of knowledge in which I could show my uncontested superiority to the world entire.
When John Ashbery died last summer, I was reminded of the novel he co-wrote with James Schuyler, A Nest of Ninnies, which remains largely unknown though it is one of the best post-modern novels.
The answer to the question: "What will we do without Uber?" is surely: "What did you do in 2009, you ninnies?" given that the company didn't exist then.
Uproar.) That's my advice for you, ninnies. For now, I won't charge you for it.
He compares the sound with a herd of braying ninnies - and looks at how his gay voice is influenced by upbringing and gay representations on TV and in cinema.
Tonight, having jumped through all the flaming hoops of the past ten weeks and survived such epic fails as Vase-gate and The Away Day To Hell, now somebody is actually going to read their business plans and expose some of them at least as the deluded ninnies we've always suspected them to be.
What we get then is a list that celebrates the longevity of classic songs and damns today's fly-by-night ninnies as fly-by-night ninnies.
Or I was until I realised that those over-paid ninnies who fall down with a slight breeze with diving skills that would have knocked Tom Daley out of his bronze medal position don't inspire me in the slightest.
"If that weren't bad enough, I'm also an actor - one of those pampered ninnies who hasn't bought a loaf of bread in a decade and can't find his way through an airport without a babysitter."
The introduction to Armin's Two Maids of More-Clacke informs us to the contrary that the play was inspired by the popularity of his impersonation of local natural John of the Hospital, and the introduction to his Nest of Ninnies (1608) makes it clear that artificial fools, like Armin, imitate natural fools "liking the disguise." (1) Hornback quotes this statement but fails to understand the deliberate confusion between artificial and natural folly that was central to Armin's art, and this undermines the dichotomy between Quarto Fool and Folio Fool attempted in this chapter.