nitery


Also found in: Idioms.

nitery

(ˈnaɪtərɪ) or

niterie

n, pl -eries
a nightclub
References in periodicals archive ?
Rationings of scarce items and patriotic plantings of Victory Gardens made the indulgences of a fancy dinner at a ritzy nitery seem unseemly.
Last winter, the Caesars-owned Planet Hollywood opened a permanent residency space for Britney Spears, rebuilding the Axis Theater into a 4,600-seat venue that functions as a hybrid performance venue and nightclub, with state-of-the-art production facilities and a bottle service-style customer experience designed by nitery entrepreneur Victor Drai.
Rouge Lounge, 1937 Coolidge Highway--Ed Sarkesian's River Rouge nitery was the main spot for national jazz talent from 1953 through 1958.
The cornerstone of the Harlem Renaissance, this pulsating jazz nitery provided an exciting showground for Depression-era black performers whose mark on American culture would be indelible.
The maestro was snapped leaving some nitery or other in a frock coat looking, yes...fat.
We'll never catch a wire in a decent nitery without pressing some barrel-house to make the cats swing.
for this breezy revue celebrating the sounds and styles of the nitery that reigned over Harlem from 1924-36.
In the crush of reporting on the premature death of Amy Winehouse, much was made (probably too much) of her inclusion in the "27 Club," that exclusive eternal nitery where music stars Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones, Kurt Cobain and now Winehouse all found themselves, age 27, famous and dead.
Triad henchmen now have the envelope, but with a little bit of (witty) torture, the duo determine the truth lies with Genevieve (the exotic Noemie Lenoir), the star attraction at an underground Paris nitery.