no-claims bonus


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no-claims bonus

n
(Insurance) a reduction on an insurance premium, esp one covering a motor vehicle, if no claims have been made within a specified period. Also called: no-claim bonus
Translations

no-claims bonus

[ˌnəʊˈkleɪmz ˌbəʊnəs] nbonus malus m inv
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References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that an accident has occurred makes you more of a risk in the eyes of the insurer, so this can have an impact on your no-claims bonus.
If a driver is involved in an accident with an uninsured driver, it means they can end up losing money or any no-claims bonus even if the accident was not their fault.
If you are involved in an accident with an uninsured driver this can mean you end up losing money or your no-claims bonus even if the accident wasn't your fault.
If you are involved in an accident with an uninsured driver, this can mean you end up losing money or your no-claims bonus - even if the accident wasn't your fault.
Q I'm disputing my no-claims bonus with my car insurance company.
The car had only just been paid off after five years of payments, and she will lose her no-claims bonus.
On its website, Admiral said: "New drivers are often quoted much higher insurance premiums as they have little driving history, zero no-claims bonus and are viewed as 'high risk.
The Order obliges all providers of private motor insurance (PMI) - both brokers and insurers - to present existing and prospective customers with information on the costs and benefits of no-claims bonus (NCB) protection, including what happens to these bonuses in the event of claims being made.
com/latesttip You won't earn the year's no-claims bonus, but if it means you save now and prevent future price rises it can be a big winner.
The difference between a no-claims bonus and a bankers' bonus is that you lose your no-claims bonus after a crash.
In some countries, insurance companies can deny the claims of drivers who contributed to a crash by failing to indicate or take away their no-claims bonus effectively raising premiums by as much as 25 per cent," says Bernadette.
Innocent victims who have been hit by uninsured drivers often lose their excess and no-claims bonus because they have no insurance company to claim against.