no-fault


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no-fault

(nō′fôlt′)
adj.
1. Of or related to a form of state-mandated automobile insurance that compensates a policy holder who becomes an accident victim, regardless of who is at fault.
2. Law Of or related to a type of divorce that is granted without requiring proof of fault or bad conduct on the part of either spouse.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

no′-fault`



n.
1. a form of automobile insurance entitling a policyholder in case of an accident to collect basic compensation for any financial loss without a determination of liability.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to such insurance.
3. holding neither party responsible.
[1965–70, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

no-fault

[ˈnəʊˈfɔːlt] ADJ no-fault agreementacuerdo m de pago respectivo
no-fault divorcedivorcio m en el que no se culpa a ninguno de los esposos
no-fault insuranceseguro m en el que no entra el factor de culpabilidad
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

no-fault

(US)
adj
(Insur) coveragemit garantierter Entschädigungssumme
n (also no-fault insurance) Kraftfahrzeugversicherung mit garantierter Auszahlung einer Entschädigungssumme ohne vorherige Klärung der Unfallschuld
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
With mercifully few references to Kenneth Starr--save a delicious critique of the dereliction of duty by Congresses that give a "fascistic writ of power" to special prosecutors--McCarthy's No-Fault Politics (Times Books, 1998) diagnoses what ails the body politic with the skill of a man who has been trying to cure it for the better part of the century.
Fifteen states worked out legislation along those lines and created no-fault insurance.
However, the purchase of a separate worker's compensation policy or additional no-fault medical coverage under a homeowner's insurance policy is a good way to protect everyone's interests.
All fifty states permit couples to divorce by mutual consent (bilateral no-fault divorce), about 40 permit one partner to divorce without assigning blame even when the other wants to stay married (unilateral no-fault).
Solicitors Jasdeep Nagra and Pam Arrowsmith, who both specialise in divorce, financial matters, children and disputes with cohabitating partners for Thursfields Solicitors, said the complimentary sessions enable unhappy couples to consider the forthcoming new route of 'no-fault' divorces.
In the rest of the county, there were 495 repossessions over the same period, including 152 accelerated possessions, while in Powys 109 families lost their homes , with 17 no-fault evictions.
The defendant, as assignee of Krull, submitted a claim to the plaintiff insurer for no-fault insurance benefits for the surgery and related care.
The lawyer said: "News of there being plans to legislate for no-fault divorce, after the consultation last autumn, is welcome to all those who work in this area, who see the unnecessary acrimony caused day in, day out by the current fault-based system.
Employee has a claim under WC, a quasi no-fault system that requires an employer to compensate its employees only for accidents occurring in the workplace.
Under Michigan's No-Fault Act, the plaintiff hospital sought "assignment of a claim as a healthcare provider in connection with services it provided to an uninsured person involved in a motor vehicle accident." The plaintiff also sought payment of personal injury protection insurance (PIP) benefits.
Insurance Fraud Case in New York May Impact First Party No-Fault Benefits