nobbut

nobbut

(ˈnɒbət)
adv
dialect nothing but; only
[C14: from no2 + but1]
References in classic literature ?
There's nobbut t' missis; and shoo'll not oppen 't an ye mak' yer flaysome dins till neeght.
I ha nobbut work to live by; and wheerever can I go, I who ha worked sin I were no heighth at aw, in Coketown heer?
It was famous in Victorian times, but it's nobbut a halt for local services now.
The Lancashire version of the proverb is "there's nobbut three generations atween a clog and clog.
Then it were turned into Mr Marvel's Fun Park, and now just look at it; nobbut a concrete desert.
One of Anderson's characters, Jack Spang, was a man, others by comparison were young children, because: "At runnin, at russlin, at lowpin, They're nobbut leyke bairns to Jack Spang".
At the age of 72, the miner's lad from Cudworth - nobbut a few miles from my home town - is writing his autobiography.
When I were nobbut a lad (he said, snapping his gums and trying to get the leg of the Zimmer off his gaily coloured carpet slipper), there was no question about the King George's status.
Aye, let's see what he's gotten," they screamed, and "Nay, he's nobbut half a man at that," and "Reach us the oil can here.
Soon, this gardener of the heart will be in our patch to promote his new book, Nobbut A Lad, a memoir of childhood in Ilkley, West Yorkshire.
His second volume of memoirs, Nobbut ALad, will be published in October.