noblesse


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Related to noblesse: noblesse oblige

no·blesse

 (nō-blĕs′)
n.
1. Noble birth or condition.
2. The members of the nobility, especially the French nobility.

[Middle English, from Old French, from noble, noble, from Latin nōbilis; see noble.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

noblesse

(nəʊˈblɛs)
n
1. noble birth or condition
2. the noble class
[C13: from Old French; see noble]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.noblesse - the state of being of noble birth
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
purple - of imperial status; "he was born to the purple"
2.noblesse - members of the nobility (especially of the French nobility)
aristocracy, nobility - a privileged class holding hereditary titles
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

noblesse

noun
Noble rank or status by birth:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

noblesse

nNoblesse f; noblesse obligeAdel verpflichtet, noblesse oblige
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Spenser called his poems Aeclogues, from a Greek word meaning Goatherds' Tales, "Though indeed few goatherds have to do herein." He dedicated them to Sir Philip Sidney as "the president of noblesse and of chivalrie."
You have heard me speak of my cousine de Maisonrouge, that grande belle femme, who, after having married, en secondes noces--there had been, to tell the truth, some irregularity about her first union--a venerable relic of the old noblesse of Poitou, was left, by the death of her husband, complicated by the indulgence of expensive tastes on an income of 17,000 francs, on the pavement of Paris, with two little demons of daughters to bring up in the path of virtue.
Certains droits et privileges de la noblesse me paraissent etre des moyens de soutenir ce sentiment."*
It would not be very long before the middle classes in their turn would be looked upon by the people as a sort of noblesse; they would be a sorry kind of noblesse, it is true, but their wealth and privileges would seem so much the more hateful in the eyes of the people because they would have a closer vision of these things.
For removing discontentments, or at least the danger of them; there is in every state (as we know) two portions of subjects; the noblesse and the commonalty.
An adventurer like Lemuel Struthers might build up the millions of his Shoe Polish on any number of shady dealings; but unblemished honesty was the noblesse oblige of old financial New York.
On the morrow, all the noblesse of the provinces, of the environs, and wherever messengers had carried the news, might have been seen arriving in detachments.
As for you and me, noblesse oblige'--he watched me narrowly.
The French noblesse chose to have the people `sans culottes,' and they had `sans culotte' governors to their hearts' content.
"That, in consequence of holding that post, he has for him all the parliament, as he has all the army by his largesses, literature by his favors, and the noblesse by his presents."
He found, with rare and mythical exceptions, that there was no noblesse oblige among the business and financial supermen.
'Er--well,' he said, ' noblesse oblige , don't you know, what?'