noblewoman

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no·ble·wom·an

 (nō′bəl-wo͝om′ən)
n.
A woman of noble rank.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

noblewoman

(ˈnəʊbəlwʊmən)
n, pl -women
a woman of noble rank, title, or status; peer; aristocrat
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

no•ble•wom•an

(ˈnoʊ bəlˌwʊm ən)

n., pl. -wom•en.
a woman of noble birth or rank.
[1565–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.noblewoman - a woman of the peerage in Britainnoblewoman - a woman of the peerage in Britain  
baronage, peerage - the peers of a kingdom considered as a group
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
baroness - a noblewoman who holds the rank of baron or who is the wife or widow of a baron
countess - female equivalent of a count or earl
duchess - the wife of a duke or a woman holding ducal title in her own right
female aristocrat - a woman who is an aristocrat
lady-in-waiting - a lady appointed to attend to a queen or princess
marquise, marchioness - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countess
Milady - an English noblewoman
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

noblewoman

[ˈnəʊblwʊmən] N (noblewomen (pl)) → noble f, aristócrata f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

noblewoman

[ˈnəʊbəlwʊmən] n (= aristocrat) → noble f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

noblewoman

n pl <-women> → Adlige f; (married also) → Edelfrau f (Hist); (unmarried also) → Edelfräulein nt (Hist)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

noblewoman

[ˈnəʊblˌwʊmən] n (-women (pl)) → nobile f, nobildonna
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The music on this disc was all composed by Russian noblewomen of the era (hence its title), and selected for court use by Catherine herself.
Her examination of the lives of five Scottish women who shared the name Euphemia is a clear, readable survey of many aspects of the world that noblewomen inhabited.
Citing many examples and quoting primary sources, Coolidge (history, Grand Valley State U., Michigan) relates how noblewomen ruled vast estates and rural holdings; were often highly educated and in turn saw to the education of their children; were the patrons of major religious institutions; and as guardians, wrangled complex legal and financial deals, particularly in connection to marriages, with the links marriage carried to large property holdings and power.
Second, these treatises on women's virtue and intellect span the entire seventeenth century and more, in an almost unbroken link to one another, including the lateral connection established in dedications and prefaces between noblewomen and their liegewomen and the link made from the homage paid by some noble and bourgeois women to their female authorial antecedents.
They offer this collection as a rebuttal to the more recent view that medieval women, including noblewomen, gradually lost effective political power in the course of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.
Fray Gabriel Tellez details four seductions divided symmetrically by class: two noblewomen and two ordinary women presented in pairs, first a noblewoman (Isabella), then a commoner (Tisbea) followed by another noblewoman (Dona Ana) and a second commoner (Aminta).
He also describes tactics and logistics, psychological warfare, the "rules" of war and the role of women, noting that many women fought, especially as defenders, and that noblewomen led their armies, although his examples don't begin to cover the subject.
Letters as evidence of women's multiple roles both early and late in the period comes from Jennifer Ward's "Letter-Writing by English Noblewomen in the Early Fifteenth Century," in which women's involvement in estate management and patronage is documented, and from Jacqueline Eales' "Patriarchy, Puritanism and Politics: the Letters of Lady Brilliana Harley (1598-1643)" where Harley's active participation in local politics and in running family affairs is examined.
dissertation at the University of London, Russell traces the life of the Italian noblewomen through the lens of the religious beliefs she held and the subversive agenda she pursued in the atmosphere of religious uncertainty and controversy that pervaded the Italian peninsula at the time.
Colette Winn has edited two parallel volumes of writings by French noblewomen at the end of the sixteenth century.
"God permit me vengeance upon these evil ones who have ruined France -- alas, they are the cause of my great misery." The pro-Catholic bent of this plaint not only buries the horrible immorality of Conde's murderers, it enjoins other noblewomen to lament the troubles perpetuated by Protestantism and ends by begging God to aid the kin g in vanquishing the misbelievers.
Complicating Vecellio's attempts to disentangle courtesans from noblewomen is the proliferation of styles of dress.