noblewoman

(redirected from noblewomen)
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no·ble·wom·an

 (nō′bəl-wo͝om′ən)
n.
A woman of noble rank.

noblewoman

(ˈnəʊbəlwʊmən)
n, pl -women
a woman of noble rank, title, or status; peer; aristocrat

no•ble•wom•an

(ˈnoʊ bəlˌwʊm ən)

n., pl. -wom•en.
a woman of noble birth or rank.
[1565–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.noblewoman - a woman of the peerage in Britainnoblewoman - a woman of the peerage in Britain  
baronage, peerage - the peers of a kingdom considered as a group
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
baroness - a noblewoman who holds the rank of baron or who is the wife or widow of a baron
countess - female equivalent of a count or earl
duchess - the wife of a duke or a woman holding ducal title in her own right
female aristocrat - a woman who is an aristocrat
lady-in-waiting - a lady appointed to attend to a queen or princess
marquise, marchioness - a noblewoman ranking below a duchess and above a countess
Milady - an English noblewoman
noble, nobleman, Lord - a titled peer of the realm
Translations

noblewoman

[ˈnəʊblwʊmən] N (noblewomen (pl)) → noble f, aristócrata f

noblewoman

[ˈnəʊbəlwʊmən] n (= aristocrat) → noble f

noblewoman

n pl <-women> → Adlige f; (married also) → Edelfrau f (Hist); (unmarried also) → Edelfräulein nt (Hist)

noblewoman

[ˈnəʊblˌwʊmən] n (-women (pl)) → nobile f, nobildonna
References in periodicals archive ?
In the preface to the Russian translation of her monograph, A Woman's Kingdom: Noblewomen and the Control of Property in Russia, 1700-1861, Michelle wrote with appreciation of her mentors and advisers: John Bushnell, David Joravsky, and Sarah Maza.
Her primary focus is on the interaction between Hawaiian noblewomen and female missionaries (especially the earliest ones), and she does much more than other scholars have done to bring this interaction to light.
Trobairitz were the female poets of the 12th and 13th centuries, mostly noblewomen in the south of France, wives and daughters of dukes and counts, often the lovers of troubadours and minstrels.
Neglected in modern scholarship, this book merits attention: it not only recounts a pivotal time but it contains character and style analyses of important writers and an extensive survey of contemporary Italian noblewomen.
Hildegard believed the wordly differences between men and women were not without remedy, but she saw social classes as being much more rigid: only noblewomen were allowed to join her monastery.
ROME: The Coliseum in Rome held a special tour to mark Women's Day on Thursday, exploring the famous monument's feminine angle - from female gladiators to noblewomen in love with the arena fighters.
NobleWomen is on display from today until August 27 in the cathedral.
A PAINTING exhibition inspired by the history of the noblewomen featured in Liverpool Cathedral's Lady Chapel is opening next week.
From as early as the 17th century when the decorative and ornamental appearance reflected the role of noblewomen, later periods saw the advent of the bracelet-watch, an accessory still considered fashionable and sophisticated in current standards and a modern audience.
They played noblewomen on stage and became the mistresses of noblemen offstage.
That audience is an extraordinary one, an audience of noblewomen who read Christine de Pizan's manuscripts and celebrated the heroines she wrote about in the most luxurious art form of the Late Middle Ages: the tapestry.
Her salon, primarily populated by other noblewomen, was an oasis for polite discussion, refined manners, literary composition and playful banter.