nobly


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no·ble

 (nō′bəl)
adj. no·bler, no·blest
1. Possessing hereditary rank in a political system or social class derived from a feudalistic stage of a country's development.
2.
a. Having or showing qualities of high moral character, such as courage, generosity, or honor: a noble spirit.
b. Proceeding from or indicative of such a character; showing magnanimity: "What poor an instrument / May do a noble deed!" (Shakespeare).
3. Grand and stately in appearance; majestic: "a mighty Spanish chestnut, bare now of leaves, but in summer a noble tree" (Richard Jeffries).
4. Chemistry Inactive or inert.
n.
1. A member of the nobility.
2. A gold coin formerly used in England, worth half of a mark.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin nōbilis; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

no′ble·ness n.
no′bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.nobly - in a noble manner; "she has behaved nobly"
Translations
بِصورَةٍ نَبيلَه
ušlechtile
göfugmannlega, drengilega
ušľachtilo
asilşerefli bir şekilde

nobly

[ˈnəʊblɪ] ADVnoblemente, con nobleza (fig) → generosamente, con generosidad

nobly

[ˈnəʊbli] adv
(= unselfishly) [behave, offer] → généreusement
(= aristocratically) to be nobly born → être de naissance noble

nobly

adv
(= aristocratically)vornehm; nobly bornvon edler Geburt
(= finely)edel, vornehm; (= bravely)wacker, heldenhaft; you’ve done noblydu hast dich wacker geschlagen (inf)
(= impressively) proportionedprächtig, prachtvoll
(inf: = selflessly) → großmütig; he nobly gave up his weekendgroßmütigerweise opferte er sein Wochenende

nobly

[ˈnəʊblɪ] adv (selflessly) → generosamente

noble

(ˈnəubl) adjective
1. honourable; unselfish. a noble mind; a noble deed.
2. of high birth or rank. a noble family; of noble birth.
noun
a person of high birth. The nobles planned to murder the king.
noˈbility (-ˈbi-) noun
1. the state of being noble. the nobility of his mind/birth.
2. nobles ie dukes, earls etc. The nobility supported the king during the revolution.
ˈnobly adverb
He worked nobly for the cause of peace.
ˈnoblemanfeminine ˈnoblewoman noun
a noble. The king was murdered by a nobleman at his court.
References in classic literature ?
It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced.
Yes, Bwikov has acted nobly, and you have no choice but to accept him.
The writer, indeed, seems to think himself obliged to keep even pace with time, whose amanuensis he is; and, like his master, travels as slowly through centuries of monkish dulness, when the world seems to have been asleep, as through that bright and busy age so nobly distinguished by the excellent Latin poet--
this about your own friend, whom you knew so much better yourself, yet you see that even you did not know how nobly he tried to undo the wrong he had done you; and now I think I know why he kept it to himself.
time was, when as the sunrise nobly spurred me, so the sunset soothed.
replied my Husband in a most nobly contemptuous Manner) and dost thou then imagine that there is no other support for an exalted mind (such as is my Laura's) than the mean and indelicate employment of Eating and Drinking?
in all beside Of glory which the world hath known Stands she not nobly and alone?
She may have a noble nature; and she may show it nobly yet.
The sixteen sonnets which belong here show how nobly this form could be adapted to the varied expression of the most serious thought, but otherwise Milton abandoned poetry, at least the publication of it, for prose, and for prose which was mostly ephemeral.
Indeed, the mercury itself is not so variable as this class of passengers, whom you will see, when the ship is going nobly through the water, quite pale with admiration, swearing that the captain beats all captains ever known, and even hinting at subscriptions for a piece of plate; and who, next morning, when the breeze has lulled, and all the sails hang useless in the idle air, shake their despondent heads again, and say, with screwed-up lips, they hope that captain is a sailor - but they shrewdly doubt him.
You may struggle nobly for twenty-four hours, maybe, if you are an adamantine sort of person, but in the mean time you will have been so wretchedly served, and so insolently, that you will haul down your colors, and go to impoverishing yourself with fees.
With equal pleasure I have as often taken notice that Providence has been pleased to give this one connected country to one united people -- a people descended from the same ancestors, speaking the same language, professing the same religion, attached to the same principles of government, very similar in their manners and customs, and who, by their joint counsels, arms, and efforts, fighting side by side throughout a long and bloody war, have nobly established general liberty and independence.