nocturne


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noc·turne

 (nŏk′tûrn′)
n.
1. A painting of a night scene.
2. An instrumental composition of a pensive, dreamy mood, especially one for the piano.

[French, from Old French, nocturnal, from Latin nocturnus; see nocturnal.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nocturne

(ˈnɒktɜːn)
n
1. (Classical Music) a short, lyrical piece of music, esp one for the piano
2. (Art Terms) a painting or tone poem of a night scene
3. (Classical Music) a painting or tone poem of a night scene
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

noc•turne

(ˈnɒk tɜrn)

n.
1. an artistic work appropriate to the night.
2. a dramatic, brooding piano composition.
[1860–65; < French nocturne]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

nocturne

a painting of a night scene, a genre particularly favored by Whistler. See also music.
See also: Art
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

nocturne

A lyrical serenade, especially in Chopin’s works for piano.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nocturne - a pensive lyrical piece of music (especially for the piano)
musical composition, opus, piece of music, composition, piece - a musical work that has been created; "the composition is written in four movements"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

nocturne

[ˈnɒktɜːn] N (Mus) → nocturno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nocturne

n (Mus) → Nocturne f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

nocturne

[ˈnɒktɜːn] n (Mus) → notturno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Play me a nocturne, Dorian, and, as you play, tell me, in a low voice, how you have kept your youth.
For young lovers at their windows; for every one fortunate enough to have seen it: "Qu'il est joli ce paysage du Paris nocturne d'il y a cent ans!" We think we shall best do justice to an unusually pretty book by taking one of M.
That evening she sang and played to him for a long time, exclaiming now and then: "We want a man's voice for this nocturne." Ginevra was an Italian, and that says all.
She opened the piano and sang, played charming nocturnes and scherzos with a grace and sentiment which displayed a perfect freedom of mind, thus triumphing over her father, whose darkling face showed no softening.
Dimmler, please play my favorite nocturne by Field," came the old countess' voice from the drawing room.
The short films are AVE MARIA by Basil Khalil, Ayny by Ahmed Saleh, Nocturne in Black by Jimmy Keyrouz,The Rifle, The Jackal, The Wolf, and The Boy by Oualid Mouaness, and Baheya & Mahmoud by Zaid Abu Hamdan.
Each recital highlights the influences brought to bear on Chopin by his predecessors with works by Bach, Mozart, and the composer credited with giving birth to the Nocturne, John Field.
Kylie Minoguehas been announced as the first headliner for Nocturne Live 2018 and Hampton Court Palace Festival.
He liked everything, he said, and the deep-fried pork belly (lechon kawali) was the best-with the Taittinger Nocturne Sec.
Le tapage nocturne a atteint des seuils intolerables dans certains quartiers d'Alger.