nog

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Related to nogg: eggnog, noggin

nog 1

 (nŏg)
n.
1. A wooden block built into a masonry wall to hold nails that support joinery structures.
2. A wooden peg or pin.

[Origin unknown.]

nog 2

 (nŏg)
n.
Eggnog.

nog

(nɒɡ) or

nogg

n
1. (Brewing) Also called: flip a drink, esp an alcoholic one, containing beaten egg
2. (Brewing) dialect East Anglian strong local beer
[C17 (originally: a strong beer): of obscure origin]

nog

(nɒɡ)
n
1. (Building) a wooden peg or block built into a masonry or brick wall to provide a fixing for nails
2. (Building) short for nogging1
[C17: origin unknown]

nog1

(nɒg)

n.
1. any beverage made with beaten eggs; eggnog.
2. a strong ale formerly brewed in Norfolk, England.
[1685–95]

nog2

(nɒg)

n.
a block of wood, as one in brickwork providing a hold for nails.
[1605–15; perhaps variant of knag, Middle English knagge fastener, peg]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nog - a wooden pin pushed or driven into a surfacenog - a wooden pin pushed or driven into a surface
pin - a small slender (often pointed) piece of wood or metal used to support or fasten or attach things
golf tee, tee - a short peg put into the ground to hold a golf ball off the ground
tent peg - a peg driven into the ground to hold a rope supporting a tent
treenail, trenail, trunnel - a wooden peg that is used to fasten timbers in shipbuilding; water causes the peg to swell and hold the timbers fast
2.nog - a wooden block built into a masonry wall so that joinery structure can be nailed to it
block - a solid piece of something (usually having flat rectangular sides); "the pyramids were built with large stone blocks"
References in classic literature ?
Having adopted in its place a dirty cotton nightcap, and groped about in the dark till he found a remnant of candle, he knocked at the partition which divided the two garrets, and inquired, in a loud voice, whether Mr Noggs had a light.
Uttering a low querulous growl, the speaker, whose harsh countenance was the very epitome of selfishness, raked the scanty fire nearly out of the grate, and, emptying the glass which Noggs had pushed towards him, inquired where he kept his coals.
Newman Noggs pointed to the bottom of a cupboard, and Mr Crowl, seizing the shovel, threw on half the stock: which Noggs very deliberately took off again, without saying a word.