noisy


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noisy

loud, harsh, or confused sounds; clamorous; tumultuous; vociferous: noisy football fans.
Not to be confused with:
noisome – offensive or disgusting, as an odor; harmful; noxious; stinking: noisome factory emissions
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

nois·y

 (noi′zē)
adj. nois·i·er, nois·i·est
1. Making noise: a small, noisy dog.
2. Full of, characterized by, or accompanied by noise: a noisy cafeteria.

nois′i·ly adv.
nois′i·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

noisy

(ˈnɔɪzɪ)
adj, noisier or noisiest
1. making a loud or constant noise
2. full of or characterized by noise
ˈnoisily adv
ˈnoisiness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nois•y

(ˈnɔɪ zi)

adj. nois•i•er, nois•i•est.
1. making much noise: noisy children.
2. abounding in or full of noise: a noisy party; a noisy demonstration.
[1685–95]
nois′i•ly, adv.
nois′i•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

noisy

  • corroboree - A large, noisy gathering.
  • crash - May have been created as an imitation of the sound of noisy breaking, or may be a blend of craze and dash.
  • obstreperous - Meaning "clamorous, noisy" and "argumentative," it is from Latin ob-, "against," and strepere, "to make a noise."
  • strepent, strepitent - Strepent and strepitent mean "noisy."
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.noisy - full of or characterized by loud and nonmusical sounds; "a noisy cafeteria"; "a small noisy dog"
cacophonic, cacophonous - having an unpleasant sound; "as cacophonous as a henyard"- John McCarten
loud - characterized by or producing sound of great volume or intensity; "a group of loud children"; "loud thunder"; "her voice was too loud"; "loud trombones"
quiet - free of noise or uproar; or making little if any sound; "a quiet audience at the concert"; "the room was dark and quiet"
2.noisy - attracting attention by showiness or bright colors; "a noisy sweater"
colourful, colorful - striking in variety and interest; "a colorful period of history"; "a colorful character"; "colorful language"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

noisy

adjective
2. loud, piercing, deafening, tumultuous, ear-splitting, cacophonous, clamorous It may be necessary to ask a neighbour to turn down noisy music.
loud still, quiet, silent, hushed, tranquil
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
ضاجٌّ، كَثير الضَّوْضاءكَثِيرُ الْضَوضَاءِ
hlučný
larmende
äänekäs
bučanglasan
hávaîasamur
やかましい
시끄러운
hrupen
högljudd
เสียงดัง
gürültücügürültülü
ồn ào

noisy

[ˈnɔɪzɪ] ADJ (noisier (compar) (noisiest (superl))) [neighbours, children, crowd] → ruidoso, escandaloso; [music] → ruidoso, estridente
it's very noisy herehay mucho ruido aquí
don't be too noisyno hagáis mucho ruido
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

noisy

[ˈnɔɪzi] adj
[person, audience, neighbours, crowd] → bruyant(e)
to be noisy → faire du bruit
The audience was so noisy that → Le public faisait tellement de bruit que ...
[car, machine] → bruyant(e)
[city, room, bar] → bruyant(e)
It's noisy in here → Il y a beaucoup de bruit ici.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

noisy

adj (+er)laut; traffic, child alsolärmend; machine, behaviour, work alsogeräuschvoll; protest, welcome, debatelautstark; don’t be so noisysei nicht so laut, mach nicht so viel Lärm; this is a noisy housein dem Haus ist es laut
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

noisy

[ˈnɔɪzɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (street, car) → rumoroso/a; (child, party) → rumoroso/a, chiassoso/a
stop being noisy! → smettila di far rumore!
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

noise

(noiz) noun
1. a sound. I heard a strange noise outside; the noise of gunfire.
2. an unpleasantly loud sound. I hate noise.
ˈnoiseless adjective
without any sound. noiseless footsteps.
ˈnoiselessly adverb
ˈnoisy adjective
making a loud noise. noisy children; a noisy engine.
ˈnoisily adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

noisy

كَثِيرُ الْضَوضَاءِ hlučný larmende laut φασαριόζικος ruidoso äänekäs bruyant bučan rumoroso やかましい 시끄러운 lawaaierig bråkete hałaśliwy barulhento шумный högljudd เสียงดัง gürültülü ồn ào 吵杂的
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

noisy

a. ruidoso-a, turbulento-a, bullicioso-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
There is no order more noisily given or taken up with lustier shouts on board a homeward-bound merchant ship than the command, "Man the windlass!" The rush of expectant men out of the forecastle, the snatching of hand-spikes, the tramp of feet, the clink of the pawls, make a stirring accompaniment to a plaintive up-anchor song with a roaring chorus; and this burst of noisy activity from a whole ship's crew seems like a voiceful awakening of the ship herself, till then, in the picturesque phrase of Dutch seamen, "lying asleep upon her iron."
And he answered `that Monsieur Bazin went to Noisy.' 'Tis his custom.
"Because, my child," replied the Buck, "my temper is so uncertain that if I permit one of those noisy creatures to come into my presence I am likely to forget myself and do him an injury."
I would e'en take it for sublime, did I not know that the colic is a noisy malady.
And in the house she bare Hermes a dear son who from his birth was marvellous to look upon, with goat's feet and two horns -- a noisy, merry-laughing child.
She hoped he would not be noisy and rough, because her husband did not like rough and noisy boys.
Some noisy men were quiet as she passed them on the platform, and one whispered something about her to another-- something vile, no doubt.
They rattled on through the noisy, bustling, crowded street of London, now displaying long double rows of brightly-burning lamps, dotted here and there with the chemists' glaring lights, and illuminated besides with the brilliant flood that streamed from the windows of the shops, where sparkling jewellery, silks and velvets of the richest colours, the most inviting delicacies, and most sumptuous articles of luxurious ornament, succeeded each other in rich and glittering profusion.
Yes, this is VANITY FAIR; not a moral place certainly; nor a merry one, though very noisy. Look at the faces of the actors and buffoons when they come off from their business; and Tom Fool washing the paint off his cheeks before he sits down to dinner with his wife and the little Jack Puddings behind the canvas.
On every piece of waste or common ground, some small gambler drove his noisy trade, and bellowed to the idle passersby to stop and try their chance; the crowd grew thicker and more noisy; gilt gingerbread in blanket-stalls exposed its glories to the dust; and often a four-horse carriage, dashing by, obscured all objects in the gritty cloud it raised, and left them, stunned and blinded, far behind.
They met for the sake of eating, drinking, and laughing together, playing at cards, or consequences, or any other game that was sufficiently noisy.
Yet among all this noisy boyish fun and laughter, Wordsworth's strange, keen love of nature took root and grew.