nomad


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

no·mad

 (nō′măd′)
n.
1. A member of a group of people who have no fixed home and move according to the seasons from place to place in search of food, water, and grazing land.
2. A person with no fixed residence who roams about; a wanderer.

[French nomade, from Latin nomas, nomad-, from Greek nomas, wandering in search of pasture; see nem- in Indo-European roots.]

no·mad′ic adj.
no·mad′i·cal·ly adv.
no′mad′ism n.

nomad

(ˈnəʊmæd)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) a member of a people or tribe who move from place to place to find pasture and food
2. a person who continually moves from place to place; wanderer
[C16: via French from Latin nomas wandering shepherd, from Greek; related to nemein to feed, pasture]
ˈnomadism n

no•mad

(ˈnoʊ mæd)

n.
1. a member of a people that has no permanent abode but moves from place to place along a traditional circuit in search of pasturage or food.
2. any wanderer; itinerant.
adj.
3. nomadic.
[1580–90; < Latin nomas (s. nomad-) < Greek nomás pasturing flocks (nomádes pastoral tribes)]
no′mad•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nomad - a member of a people who have no permanent home but move about according to the seasonsnomad - a member of a people who have no permanent home but move about according to the seasons
Bedouin, Beduin - a member of a nomadic tribe of Arabs
Bushman - a member of the race of nomadic hunters and gatherers who live in southern Africa
Hun - a member of a nomadic people who invaded Europe in the 4th century
Saracen - (historically) a member of the nomadic people of the Syrian and Arabian deserts at the time of the Roman Empire
Scythian - a member of the ancient nomadic people inhabiting Scythia
bird of passage, roamer, rover, wanderer - someone who leads a wandering unsettled life

nomad

noun wanderer, migrant, rover, rambler, itinerant, drifter, vagabond The greater part was desert, inhabited by nomads.
Translations
راحِل، مُتَرَحِّل
kočovník
nomade
kulkuri
hirðingihirîingi
klajoklisklajokliškaiklajokliškas
nomads, klejotājs
kočovník

nomad

[ˈnəʊmæd] Nnómada mf

nomad

[ˈnəʊmæd] nnomade mf

nomad

nNomade m, → Nomadin f

nomad

[ˈnəʊmæd] nnomade m/f

nomad

(ˈnəumӕd) noun
one of a group of people with no permanent home who travel about with their sheep, cattle etc. Many of the people of central Asia are nomads.
noˈmadic adjective
noˈmadically adverb
References in classic literature ?
Ambrose given up editing Pindar , and taken to a nomad existence, in and out of every room in the house.
This was evidently no ordinary party of immigrants, but rather some nomad people who had been compelled from stress of circumstances to seek themselves a new country.
the nomad Scythians, who are described by Herodotus as feeding on mares' milk and living in caravans.
I snapped back at him that I had no door, that I was a nomad. He bowed ironically till his nose nearly touched his plate but begged me to remember that to his personal knowledge I had four houses of my own about the world.
On my right hand there were lines of fishing stakes re- sembling a mysterious system of half-submerged bamboo fences, incomprehensible in its division of the domain of tropical fishes, and crazy of aspect as if abandoned for- ever by some nomad tribe of fishermen now gone to the other end of the ocean; for there was no sign of human habitation as far as the eye could reach.
In the vast steppe, bathed in sunshine, he could just see, like black specks, the nomads' tents.
But the nomads were the terror of all those whom the soil or the advantages of a market had induced to build towns.
Philip passed his hand over the picture as if he wanted to feel the houses and the loose habiliments of the nomads.
Had she been a man, he argued, he should not have hesitated, for it would have meant a friend after his own heart, with whom he could ride and hunt at will; but as it was they would be hedged by the conventionalities that are even more strictly observed by the wild nomads of the desert than by their more civilized brothers and sisters.
These ordinary shares were issued at a purchase price of USD20.00 per share, for aggregate gross proceeds to Nomad Foods of approximately USD400.0m, before deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses payable by Nomad Foods.
RIYADH: The Olympic Games may celebrate the world's oldest sporting tradition, but a relative newcomer, the Nomad Games, offers a fascinating alternative to sports fans.
The Third World Nomad Games were held on a high level, representatives of around 60 countries partook in the games.