nomadism


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no·mad

 (nō′măd′)
n.
1. A member of a group of people who have no fixed home and move according to the seasons from place to place in search of food, water, and grazing land.
2. A person with no fixed residence who roams about; a wanderer.

[French nomade, from Latin nomas, nomad-, from Greek nomas, wandering in search of pasture; see nem- in Indo-European roots.]

no·mad′ic adj.
no·mad′i·cal·ly adv.
no′mad′ism n.

nomadism

a rootless, nondomestic, and roving lifestyle. — nomadic, adj.
See also: Behavior
Translations

nomadism

[ˈnəʊmədɪzəm] Nnomadismo m

nomadism

[ˈnəʊmædɪzm] nnomadismo
References in classic literature ?
As the Persian imitated in the slender shafts and capitals of his architecture the stem and flower of the lotus and palm, so the Persian court in its magnificent era never gave over the nomadism of its barbarous tribes, but travelled from Ecbatana, where the spring was spent, to Susa in summer and to Babylon for the winter.
In the early history of Asia and Africa, Nomadism and Agriculture are the two antagonist facts.
NIGERIA Veterinary Medical Association (NVMA) has said that the farmers/herdsmen crisis has become worse this year that previous years, thereby, calling on the the government and other relevant stakeholders to accelerate the transition from nomadism to ranching as the only sure-fire way to end farmers/herdsmen crisis in the country.
Montroi was envisaged to aid those who enjoy the trip as much as the destination and choose nomadism as a lifestyle.
What the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) did in Medina was a civil and political miracle in an environment that had upset the mind and endowed itself to nomadism and ignorance.
Archaeological excavations had revealed that Rajajil is indeed a burial site, but its true importance is "probably its role in the transition of lifestyles from nomadism toward sedentarism induced by climate changes on the Arabian Peninsula.
Mystical Nomadism in the Seventeenth Century: Anna Maria van Schurman and Jean de Labadie.
The book begins with an overview of the geographical, prehistoric, and historical setting, and gives a theoretical framework defining pastoralism, pastoral nomadism, transhumance, and tribalism.
EMST and its collection, which consists of more than 1,000 works of art from the 1960s onwards, and which explores concepts and practices around cultural pluralism, the intersection of cultures, the relationship between politics and art, and cultural nomadism, became central to how Documenta has been developed.
One can well understand why Kounellis would be lured by the desert, for he was one of the leading figures of Arte Povera, once described by the critic Germano Celant as "a nomadism of action.
It seemed that fixed, fenced pastures were not totally incompatible with modern nomadism.
Nomadism and exile are prominent tropes in "Far From the Shore," Kubba Kawash's exhibition of acrylic and mixed media canvases now up at Artspace Hamra.