nomadism


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no·mad

 (nō′măd′)
n.
1. A member of a group of people who have no fixed home and move according to the seasons from place to place in search of food, water, and grazing land.
2. A person with no fixed residence who roams about; a wanderer.

[French nomade, from Latin nomas, nomad-, from Greek nomas, wandering in search of pasture; see nem- in Indo-European roots.]

no·mad′ic adj.
no·mad′i·cal·ly adv.
no′mad′ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nomadism

a rootless, nondomestic, and roving lifestyle. — nomadic, adj.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

nomadism

[ˈnəʊmədɪzəm] Nnomadismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nomadism

[ˈnəʊmædɪzm] nnomadismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
As the Persian imitated in the slender shafts and capitals of his architecture the stem and flower of the lotus and palm, so the Persian court in its magnificent era never gave over the nomadism of its barbarous tribes, but travelled from Ecbatana, where the spring was spent, to Susa in summer and to Babylon for the winter.
In the early history of Asia and Africa, Nomadism and Agriculture are the two antagonist facts.
Key words: rough-legged hawk, Buteo lagopus Pontoppidan, breeding distribution, clear-cut, irruption, nomadism, Newfoundland, predator-prey cycles
I would like to suggest that this style is a new kind of linguistic nomadism that postulates the activity of thinking as a set of interrelated "situated knowledges."
It beats the imagination why a simple policy initiative concerning the nomadism and cattle ranching elude the Nigerian leadership.
But in her more recent research, which appears to have evolved from the compositional dryness of earlier works, she focuses on the evocative potential of the object, concentrating on living conditions, displacement, and nomadism.
Then she turns to the Bowles' nomadic topographies, considering tawdry nomadographies and transcultural frontiers: Two Serious Ladies and the politics of nomadism, short stories and the vendetta of nomadic politics, and theater of pastoral cruelty.
'The practice of perpetual mobility as political expression essential to cultural identity and livelihood'--an attempted definition of nomadism by Nick McDonell, a subject he feels is woefully misunderstood.
"He met with MPs who had withdrawn or had been excluded from their parliamentary groups, whom he assured of his support for political projects designed by them, without taking into account the extremely negative public attitude towards the ugly phenomena involving the restructuring of the political space and the so-called parliamentary nomadism", the document says.
A psychiatrist has explained it as "global nomadism''.
of Haifa, Israel) is presented in order to promote the value of Gur-Ze'ev's conception of the "diasporic tradition" in philosophy, the nature of which is difficult to succinctly describe but appears to center on experiences of exile and nomadism and overcoming "the temptation to offer salvation, redemption, emancipation or 'solution' of any kind, yet remain[ing] Messianic." Gur-Ze'ev sets forth his own ideas of diasporic philosophy and its relation to education, heavily informed by the experience of the Jewish Diaspora; engages in conversation with those he considers other representatives of the diasporic tradition, including Daniel Boyarin, Jonathan Boryarin, and Cornel West; and presents essays demonstrating other examples of diasporic thinking from other contributors.