nomadization

nomadization

(ˌnəʊmædaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

nomadisation

n
the process of becoming like a nomad, or making nomadic in character
References in periodicals archive ?
By nomadization, I refer to some of the spatial effects of globalization at this stage of its development, in which local homes, traditions, economies, and identities are increasingly supplanted by interconnected, uprooted, recombinant and transient identities, and space and time become increasingly entangled and compressed.
On specific issues and events in Israelite history the following are examples of differing interpretations as espoused by Finkelstein and Mazar: In debating the origins and emergence of Israel in Canaan, Finkelstein follows the indigenous Canaanite theory, identifying early Israelites as descendants of local Canaanites who were part of an ongoing process of sedentarization and nomadization.
I've always been intrigued by this nomadization of cultural ideas--the obscure ways they take and flourish at one particular intersection and not at another.
Younker employs theories on social structure and tribal societies developed by Alexander Joffe and Richard Tapper to suggest that Ammon was a "tribal state" or a "tribal confederacy" that was based on local, kin-based sedentary groups who sought to avoid state domination by the Egyptians through a process of nomadization and resettlement when the central state became weak on the margins.
While she focuses much more upon urbanization than upon increasing nomadization in the hills, Cohen is inclined to view almost all of Canaan's evolving settlement system as a marked response to the establishment of fortified coastal towns like Aphek and Ifshar.
These regions of Palestine, he explains in chapter twenty, were "Islamized" through the "double process of nomadization and sedentarization"--actually a sequential process.