nominally


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nom·i·nal

 (nŏm′ə-nəl)
adj.
1.
a. Of, resembling, relating to, or consisting of a name or names.
b. Assigned to or bearing a person's name: nominal shares.
2.
a. Existing in name only; not real: "a person with a nominal religious position but no actual duties" (Leo Damrosch).
b. Insignificantly small; trifling: a nominal sum.
3. Philosophy Of or relating to nominalism.
4. Economics Of or relating to an amount or rate that is not adjusted for inflation.
5. Business Of or relating to the par value of a security rather than the market value.
6. Grammar Of or relating to a noun or word group that functions as a noun.
n. Grammar
A word or group of words functioning as a noun.

[Middle English nominalle, of nouns, from Latin nōminālis, of names, from nōmen, nōmin-, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

nom′i·nal·ly adv.

nom•i•nal•ly

(ˈnɒm ə nl i)

adv.
in name or in name only.
[1655–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.nominally - in name only; "nominally he is the boss"
Translations

nominally

[ˈnɒmɪnəlɪ] ADVnominalmente, sólo de nombre

nominally

advnominell; it’s nominally worth £500auf dem Papier ist es £ 500 wert

nominally

[ˈnɒmɪnəlɪ] advnominalmente
References in classic literature ?
Nevertheless, as upon the good conduct of the harpooneers the success of a whaling voyage largely depends, and since in the American Fishery he is not only an important officer in the boat, but under certain circumstances (night watches on a whaling ground) the command of the ship's deck is also his; therefore the grand political maxim of the sea demands, that he should nominally live apart from the men before the mast, and be in some way distinguished as their professional superior; though always, by them, familiarly regarded as their social equal.
Altho' Lady Dorothea's visit was nominally to Philippa and Augusta, yet I have some reason to imagine that (acquainted with the Marriage and arrival of Edward) to see me was a principal motive to it.
Frederica's visit was nominally for six weeks, but her mother, though inviting her to return in one or two affectionate letters, was very ready to oblige the whole party by consenting to a prolongation of her stay, and in the course of two months ceased to write of her absence, and in the course of two or more to write to her at all.
There are two royal fish so styled by the English law writers -- the whale and the sturgeon; both royal property under certain limitations, and nominally supplying the tenth branch of the crown's ordinary revenue.
Honest John Hull's pine-tree shillings had long ago been worn out, or lost, or melted down again; and their place was supplied by bills of paper or parchment, which were nominally valued at threepence and upwards.
A room in the house could be nominally engaged for Natalie, in the assumed character of the stewardess's niece--the stewardess undertaking to answer any purely formal questions which might be put by the church authorities, and to be present at the marriage ceremony.
Collins had followed him after breakfast; and there he would continue, nominally engaged with one of the largest folios in the collection, but really talking to Mr.
In this respect his authority would be nominally the same with that of the king of Great Britain, but in substance much inferior to it.
Nominally he is only an adjutant on Kutuzov's staff, but he does everything alone.
The Socratic method is nominally retained; and every inference is either put into the mouth of the respondent or represented as the common discovery of him and Socrates.
Mr Verloc, going out in the morning, left his shop nominally in charge of his brother-in-law.
Tom Bertram had of late spent so little of his time at home that he could be only nominally missed; and Lady Bertram was soon astonished to find how very well they did even without his father, how well Edmund could supply his place in carving, talking to the steward, writing to the attorney, settling with the servants, and equally saving her from all possible fatigue or exertion in every particular but that of directing her letters.