nominative

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nom·i·na·tive

 (nŏm′ə-nā′tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Appointed to office.
b. Nominated as a candidate for office.
2. Having or bearing a person's name: nominative shares.
3. (-nə-tĭv) Grammar Of, relating to, or being the case of the subject of a finite verb (as I in I wrote the letter) and of words identified with the subject of a copula, such as a predicate nominative (as children in These are his children).
n. (-nə-tĭv) Grammar
1. The nominative case.
2. A word or form in the nominative case.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nominative

(ˈnɒmɪnətɪv; ˈnɒmnə-)
adj
1. (Grammar) grammar denoting a case of nouns and pronouns in inflected languages that is used esp to identify the subject of a finite verb. See also subjective6
2. appointed rather than elected to a position, office, etc
3. bearing the name of a person
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the nominative case
b. a word or speech element in the nominative case
[C14: from Latin nōminātīvus belonging to naming, from nōmen name]
nominatival adj
ˈnominatively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nom•i•na•tive

(ˈnɒm ə nə tɪv, ˈnɒm nə- or, for 2,3, ˈnɒm əˌneɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or being a grammatical case typically indicating the subject of a finite verb.
2. nominated; appointed by nomination.
3. made out in a person's name, as a certificate.
n.
4. the nominative case.
5. a word or other form in the nominative case, as Latin nauta “sailor” in Nauta bonus est “The sailor is good” or the English pronoun I.
nom′i•na•tive•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

nominative

A grammatical noun case that indicates the subject of a verb.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nominative - the category of nouns serving as the grammatical subject of a verb
grammatical case, case - nouns or pronouns or adjectives (often marked by inflection) related in some way to other words in a sentence
oblique, oblique case - any grammatical case other than the nominative
Adj.1.nominative - serving as or indicating the subject of a verb and words identified with the subject of a copular verb; "nominative noun endings"; "predicate nominative"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
2.nominative - named; bearing the name of a specific person; "nominative shares of stock"
specified - clearly and explicitly stated; "meals are at specified times"
3.nominative - appointed by nomination
appointed, appointive - subject to appointment
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
první pád
nominativ
nimetavnominatiiv
nominatiivi
nominativ
nefnifall
vardininkas
nominativ
imenovalnik
nominativ

nominative

[ˈnɒmɪnətɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) → nominativo
nominative casenominativo m
B. Nnominativo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nominative

[ˈnɒmənətɪv] n (also nominative case) → nominatif m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nominative

(Gram)
nNominativ m, → Werfall m
adj (the) nominative caseder Nominativ, der Werfall
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

nominative

[ˈnɒmɪnətɪv] adj & n (Gram) → nominativo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Pressed to fall back upon a nominative case, he opined that they wos about as red as ever red could be.
it's me, and me's the first person singular, nominative case, agreeing with the verb "it's", and governed by Squeers understood, as a acorn, a hour; but when the h is sounded, the a only is to be used, as a and, a art, a ighway,' replied Mr Squeers, quoting at random from the grammar.
Tom, however, with the most heroic virtue and gallantry, rushed into his sentence, searching in a high-minded manner for nominative and verb, and turning over his dictionary frantically for the first hard word that stopped him.
(8) There is also a relation between the partitive singulars that are homophonous with short illatives and those that correspond to truncated nominatives. Since only partitive singulars that are larger than minimal prosodic feet can have stems that constitute prosodic feet, the same partitive singulars that satisfy the requirements on illative singulars will correspond to 'truncated' nominative singulars.