nomism

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nomism

(ˈnəʊmɪzəm)
n
(Theology) adherence to a law or laws as a primary exercise of religion
[C20: from Greek nomos law, custom]
noˈmistic adj

nomism

the practice of religious legalism, especially the basing of standards of good actions upon the moral law.
See also: Law
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References in periodicals archive ?
This "mystery of existence" includes apocalyptic thoughts as well as nomistic components.
While denizens of the "antinomian underground" were fraying puritan tempers in London, Hooker revealed his nomistic credentials in a sermon delivered at Dedham and published, fifteen years later in 1644, as The Faithful Covenanter.
Nomistic exertion mitigated by covenantal grace yet stiffened by consciousness of rod and curse: this is the tense framework of Hooker's religion.
Much appreciated in Papua New Guinea, the Bible is a source of material, not only for its nomistic statements but also for its myths, parables, historical narratives, poems, proverbs and instructions.
It is this narrow and nomistic concept that seems to have become most popular with some theologically not so sophisticated pamphleteers.
As a curiosity, let me just mention a marginal pamphlet in which we encounter a strangely nomistic understanding of Gen 3:16: Nuns are accused of refusing the obedience they owe as women to God and to male persons when they lock themselves in in a convent instead of having children and subordinating themselves to their husbands.
In a significant departure from Wellhausen, who viewed these chapters as essentially nomistic, Nihan regards this section as an essential part of the P narrative.
Nomistic, evangelical, rationalist, and mystical strains of Puritan spirituality, he argued, can be identified in Thomas Cartwright, Richard Sibbes, John Milton, and Francis Rous respectively.
One discerns that underlying Horrell's view is a mistaken notion of models as nomistic.
The agitators in Galatia are plausibly presented as a nomistic faction from the churches in Jerusalem or Antioch who had been outmanoevered at the Jerusalem conference and took advantage of the power vacuum after the Antioch dispute.