non-drinker

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Translations

non-drinker

[ˈnɒnˈdrɪŋkəʳ] Nno bebedor(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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They concluded that alcohol increases the risk of having a stroke by around a third (35%) for every four additional drinks consumed per day, compared to non-drinkers.
Australian researchers showed that regular moderate alcohol consumption (an average of 14 glasses per week) results in more electrical evidence of scarring and impairments in electrical signaling compared with non-drinkers and light drinkers.
Compared with coffee non-drinkers, those who drank one to eight cups or more per day faced a 6 percent to 16 percent lower risk of death, regardless of whether they drank instant, ground, or decaffeinated coffee and whether they had genetic factors that influence caffeine metabolism, the study found.
Among women, non-drinkers also had an increased risk compared with people who were "consistently moderate" in their drinking habits.
A research team from University College London and French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, Inserm, found that non-drinkers have a higher risk of developing dementia later in life.
The researchers found that heavy drinkers and non-drinkers had different diversity of oral microbiota and overall bacterial profiles.
Adults with moderate alcohol intake are more likely than non-drinkers to live to age 85 without dementia or other cognitive impairments, according to a study in the August 2017 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
It came from a study published in the British Medical Journal, which found that moderate drinkers were less likely than non-drinkers to develop certain heart conditions.
They were ranked into four categories: non-drinkers; occasional drinkers (sugar-sweetened beverages once a month or less than once a week); frequent drinkers (once a week or less than once a day); and those who drank at least one sugar sweetened beverage daily.
Researchers analyzed data on 4,466 men and women, age 65 and older, who were allocated to one of four groups: non-drinkers, less than seven drinks weekly, seven to 14 drinks weekly, and more than 14 drinks a week.
In this research, over the nine-year follow up, the waistlines of the daily diet soda drinkers increased 3.16 inches compared to just 0.80 inches for non-drinkers. One theory for this effect is that the artificial sweeteners in diet sodas trick the body into consuming more calories by blocking normal feedback mechanisms so the brain is slow to signal feelings of fullness, says lead researcher Ankur Vyas, MD, of the University of Iowa.
In the study entitled, "Alcohol Consumption and Periodontitis: Quantification of Periodontal Pathogens and Cytokines," researchers assessed a sample of 542 regular alcohol users, occasional drinkers, and non-drinkers both with and without periodontitis.

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