nonaccidental injury


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Related to nonaccidental injury: Non-accidental trauma

nonaccidental injury

(ˌnɒnæksɪˈdɛntəl)
n
(Sociology) social welfare damage, such as a bruise, burn, or fracture, deliberately inflicted on a child or an old person. Abbreviation: NAI See also child abuse
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The pathologist formed the opinion that rib injuries were "most suggestive of nonaccidental injury".
Kayden's mother, Laura Davies, 25, denies causing or allowing the death of a child, and a charge of child cruelty related to allegations of an earlier nonaccidental injury.
His wife, Samantha Chiu, told of the traumatic events around Nathan's death and said it would "break her world" if it had been caused by nonaccidental injury.
Signs of a skull fracture, nonaccidental injury concern, headache, and acting abnormally were significantly associated with TBI-CT.
Additional features that predicted TBI-CT included skull fracture, nonaccidental injury concern, headache, and acting abnormally (odds ratios, 112.96, 6.75, 2.55, and 1.83, respectively).
Skeletal survey and bone scintigraphy are complementary studies in the evaluation of nonaccidental injury and should both be performed in cases of suspected child abuse [7,12,13].
The differential diagnosis for fractures that do occur includes birth trauma, nonaccidental injury (NAI), and pathologic fractures.
"There is a 95% probability fractures were caused by nonaccidental injury," he told a jury, which is also being asked to decide whether Buckley and the toddler's mother Chloe Thomas, 25, are also guilty of cruelty.
Youth versus adult "weightlifting" injuries presenting to United States emergency rooms: accidental versus nonaccidental injury mechanisms.
Extensive intraocular hemorrhage involving multiple layers, extending to the periphery of the eye globe, and presenting with retinal detachment/macular folds in young infants in the setting of acute brain injury and in the absence of a history of severe accidental trauma or underlying medical cause must be considered to be nonaccidental injury until proven otherwise (23).
"The label of nonaccidental injury should not by itself be considered to constitute a basis for the removal of children without significantly more thought and consideration than is sometimes given."