nonacting

nonacting

(ˌnɒnˈæktɪŋ)
n
(Theatre) theatre acting that is of poor quality or does not conform to conventional ideas of what constitutes acting
adj
(Theatre) theatre relating to a person that does not act or an activity that does not entail acting
References in periodicals archive ?
And one we could have addressed but didn't, with a nonacting Aquino administration.
Derek Ramsay, adjudged best actor for All of You, for what one enthralled fan calls his nonacting style.
In general, one coexecutor can bind the other, even where the nonacting coexecutor was unaware of the actions taken.
Together with Europeans, they are granted coverage of their real actions, whereas Central Asians are clearly described as a nonacting group.
We'd never been to the theatre as a family and the only actors we knew were each other!") - as well as the story of their nonacting sister, Clare, the "academic powerhouse of the family" (now a government lawyer working in Westminster).
Will the original Johannine riverbed remain firm as wu-wei mysteriously acts by nonacting?
Fassbinder's raw, anti-Hollywood approach to storytelling and his choice of peculiar actors with a nonacting style were so different from everything I had known until then.
NE of Julian Lewis Jones' proudest nonacting Omoments came on a movie set in South Africa, when Hollywood legend Clint Eastwood declared his sushi was "mighty fine".
A 90-minute wallow in frighteningly bad sound and camerawork, nonacting, relentless degradation and sex.
Titanic (194 minutes, $24.99) fractured every Academy Award record, walking off with 11 Oscars in 1997, including best picture and best director, James Cameron, triggering his triumphant echoing of a line from the movie, proclaiming himself "King of the World." The film became the all-time box-office champ, packing audiences in around the world, and swept virtually every nonacting category from cinematography to music (is there anyone who didn't eventually become sick of Celine Dion's rendition of "My Heart Will Go On"?) and all the technological categories.
Rather than giving polished, deliberated performances--as trained actors would do--Bresson's models go about what they do in his films in the understated, purposely inexpressive (some would say flat or dull) mode of nonacting life.
The Lyceum review underscores these theoretical shifts, Lewes now upholding his standard of natural acting as indistinguishable from nonacting: "Oh!