nonaddict

nonaddict

(ˌnɒnˈædɪkt)
n
(Medicine) a person who is not an addict
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The following inclusion criteria were considered: (a) presence of forearm fracture, (b) performance of open reduction surgery at Rajaei Hospital, (c) absence of underlying diseases such as coagulopathy, peripheral vascular diseases, and neuropathy, (d) patient's full agreement on performing axillary anesthesia, (e) lack of any history of allergy to local anesthetics, (f) lack of treatment with palliative drugs and those affecting the CNS, (g) being a nonaddict, and (h) suitability of patients to be placed (classified) in ASA I and II classes.
While communicating as much help as possible to each other is the primary mission of volunteers at the center, keeping the center afloat, creating its policies, goals, code of ethics, and getting the word out to the nonaddict community are all on their list.
Findings reviewed within this brief article include pain moderates patients' perception of feeling cared for (Herbst, 2011); nurses perceive addict and nonaddict patients differently (Clubb, 2011); and internal and external processes of caring evolve as clarity of self, role, and system evolve within those who are providing care (Persky, Felgen, Romana, & Nelson, 2011).
As a nonaddict, I honor his sobriety, to use the current political formulation; but I also wish he had revealed more of his tortured, tenacious soul." BRUCE HANDY
Therefore, a high index of suspicion should also be maintained for the presence of a drug-containing foreign object in the nasal cavity of a nonaddict who experiences a drug overdose.
These subjects are persons who claimed that they had few problems with the law, they kept significant social relationships with nonaddict friends and family members, that they kept in good health and that they held down a working activity.
If only addicts are given legalized drugs, what is the possibility that a good number of them will illegally sell part of their supply to nonaddict users?
Ex-addict versus nonaddict counselors' knowledge of clients' drug use.
If the addict quits, the direct impact of the stock variable persists, lowering utility below that of a similar nonaddict with the same concurrent utility function and consumption, but no history of consumption of the addictive good.
We need to face the fact that, even if addiction begins with voluntary drug use, an addict's brain is different from a nonaddict's brain, and the addicted individuals must be dealt with as if they were in a different brain state.
But McIntosh and McKeganey (2001) emphasize two aspects: Desire to restore a spoiled identity and a sense of future (via the establishment of a new, nonaddict identity), and they emphasize--among other things--the turning points and the role of triggers in bringing about the change.
In comparing three groups (i.e., sexual addicts, pathological gamblers, and nonaddicts), Raviv (1993) found that not only were sexual addicts significantly more anxious, depressed, and obsessive-compulsive than the nonaddict control group, but they were also significantly more depressed than the pathological gamblers.