nonaffluent

nonaffluent

(ˌnɒnˈæflʊənt)
adj
not affluent or rich
References in periodicals archive ?
The country ably deals with its loan obligations because of the fusion of incomes from the affluent regions even with the concomitant fiscal dispersal to the nonaffluent ones.
Democratic candidates have also repeatedly emphasized that tax cuts for the wealthy threatened commitments to nonaffluent Americans.
They're the affluent millennials, and they're quite different from the other 62 million nonaffluent millennials of the total group.
Yet her college admissions recommendations mostly overlook a substantial, nonaffluent African American middle class, sitting between the very poor and the rich.
Given prevailing socio-economic conditions affecting and marginalizing nonaffluent women ("family-hostile workplace", (69) lack of health care, poor maternity leave provisions, living wage), supportive conditions are not regularly available.
Data from ISAAC Phase II surveys found that a higher fraction of recent wheezing was attributable to atopy (measured by allergen skin test reactivity) in affluent (41%) than in nonaffluent countries (20%) (7).
It was able to attract nonaffluent consumers because of value for money but at the same time its image became good enough for more affluent customers to want to shop there too.
The systemic degradation of the political influence of the nonaffluent is best witnessed by government policy.
The American social commentator Barbara Ehrenreich has noted the disappearance of the nonaffluent as a category from contemporary social consciousness:
Obama won many of the nonaffluent voters who had supported John Edwards in earlier states.
Along with other salon-quality brands, Nexxus has provided a lift to dollar sales, say retailers, because even nonaffluent customers are deciding to trade up in pursuit of better product performance.
The park is centered in a mainly nonaffluent community, Gomez said.