nonanalytic

nonanalytic

(ˌnɒnˌænəˈlɪtɪk)
adj
not analytic or relating to analysis
References in periodicals archive ?
Against this backdrop Brotherton will present a nonanalytic interpretation of ontological argumentation for God's existence by attempting to fuse Anselmian and Godelian perspectives.
"Nonanalytic Cognition: Memory, Perception and Concept Learning." In The Psychology of Learning and Motivation.
Further cases involve the solutions for supersymmetric partner potentials much discussed in the past [15,50,51] and for several nonanalytic potentials discussed recently [52-54].
Macedo, "Nonanalytic scaling of conductance cumulants in dirty superconducting wires," Physical Review B: Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, vol.
The current study finding is consistent with a previous study (28) that reported triage decisions were often nonanalytic and based on intuition, particularly with increasing expertise in a pedia tric ED.
Although his efforts to automate the nonanalytic functions in the clinical laboratory actually date back to 1981, it has been just over a quarter century since Masahide Sasaki, considered the father of clinical laboratory automation, presented the amazing progress of his laboratory at the Kochi Medical School in Kochi, Japan, to western viewers at the 1989 AACC annual meeting (1).
Lewis, "Hypersonic ionizing air viscous shock-layer flows over nonanalytic blunt bodies," NASA Technical Report, 1975.
Furthermore, for some nonanalytic nonlinear systems, Volterra series expansion cannot be used.
The cases are categorized by analytics methodology, and they help explain the analytics approach, noting the problems such an approach will lead to both in analytical output and usefulness as well as management reaction in contrast with nonanalytic approaches.
Along the way we will introduce a lagrangian that exists as a purely polynomial expression and removes the need for complicated nonanalytic measures and rational inverse matrix functions.
This is communicated by what Hartman dubs a nonanalytic "literary knowledge" (both poetic and critical) which reads the wound of the enigmatic "real" so as to identify with it and even bring it back, but "there is a limit to recovery." Within this limit, however, a "singing 'in the face of the object' (Stevens)" can survive, so that if traumatic severance of body and mind can be overcome, it is "to come back to mind through the body." This is to be reminded, nonetheless, that within the child's framework of trust "there are infinite chances to be hurt." The symbolic, Hartman adds, is not a denial of the literal but "its uncanny intensification" ("On Traumatic Knowledge and Literary Studies," PsyArt [2004], 3,4,6,7).
He investigated nonlinear dispersion and compact structures [3], nonanalytic solitary waves [2], and a class of nonlinear dispersive-dissipative interactions [4].