nonartistic

nonartistic

(ˌnɒnɑːˈtɪstɪk)
adj
not artistic
References in periodicals archive ?
An article in L'Orient le Jour cites an unnamed Beirut Municipality source as claiming that Citerne's permit wasn't renewed because the space was "exploited for nonartistic and noncultural purposes ...
The fact that I'm a national artist means more people will want to listen to me now, even those who are nonartistic,' Kidlat told the Inquirer.
No one else has access to our PSR-I except as a result of the exteriorization of our feelings and/or emotions, which can take many artistic and nonartistic forms such as gestures, language, poetry, symbols, etc.
No original: That either they are to an extreme degree undifferentiated in themselves and therefore possess very low content of any kind, or else the differentiation that they do exhbit, which may in some cases be very considerable, comes not from the artist but from a nonartistic source, like nature or the factory.
(96) With respect to overinclusivity, all manner of nonartistic activities are often intended to express some point, from the street scalper striking his own tiny blow against Ticketmaster to the leather-jacket-wearing loiterer on the street corner hoping to convey his coolness.
Their specific functions in the texts are grounded in a general sense of the list as a mundane text type, as it is described by Sabine Mainberger, who develops her poetics of the enumerative against the reputation of the list as the epitome of the nonartistic or nonliterary (1).
For instance, in their extensive study, Hetland, Winner, Veenema, and Sheridan (2013) show that observation, reflection, and exploratory search, among other techniques, can be developed through promoting the use of the arts and instruction in artistic skills, and are a means to improve nonartistic skills in other domains.
To help familiarize organizers with the shows and to embrace nonartistic staff in the earliest stages of productions, the Playhouse's creative teams have begun taking the unusual step of opening up portions of rehearsals, inviting in observers who normally would not be part of that process.
Mari Carmen Ramirez notes, for example, "that Gego's environmental installation emerges from these contemporary interpretations as a paradigm to address a wide range of artistic and nonartistic phenomena associated with both modern and contemporary art" (29).
As Theron Schmidt identifies, artistic processes often involve large amounts of nonartistic work that is done by individuals other than the main creative force.
Though resistance might effectively deconstruct the framework of art to become increasingly aligned with nonartistic modes of political communication, it would never destroy or abandon the edifice of art for the sake of direct intervention into politics.