nonaspirin

nonaspirin

(ˌnɒnˈæspɪrɪn)
adj
(Medicine) med (of a medicine) not containing aspirin
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy and the risk of spontaneous abortion.
In nonaspirin users, naproxen was associated with significantly fewer CV events compared with lumiracoxib, whereas ibuprofen was not.
2012), total caloric intake, physical activity [< 3, 3 to < 9, 9 to < 18, 18 to < 27, or > 27 metabolic equivalent (MET), hours/week], parity (nulliparous, 1, 2-3, or > 4 children), menopausal status and hormone use, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use, warfarin use, multivitamin use, hypertension, coronary heart disease (any history of angina, coronary artery stenosis, or myocardial infarction), and rheumatologic disease (any history of systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis).
The Food and Drug Administration has taken new action to strengthen existing warning labels about the increased risk of heart attack or stroke with the use of prescription and over-the-counter nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
74) Aspirin, of course, has been in use to prevent inflammation-related cardiovascular problems for many years, and there's evidence that moderate use of both aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs such as ibuprofen may be helpful in preventing certain cancers.
87) while the use of other nonaspirin anticoagulants was not significantly associated with PCSM.
The findings in the recent study suggested that "regular use of nonaspirin nonselective NSAIDs, particularly ibuprofen, may reduce bladder cancer risk, especially among regular users for 10 years or more.
Dose-response relationships between individual nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a meta-analysis based on individual patient data.
Dose-response relationships between individual nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NANSAIDs) and serious upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a meta-analysis based on individual patient data.
Reduced risk of colorectal cancer among longterm users of aspirin and nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.
They found that people who were regular users of non-aspirin NSAIDs (those who had taken two or more pills a week for at least a month) had a 48 percent lower risk of PD, while those who had taken nonaspirin NSAIDs regularly for two or more years had a 56 percent lower risk of the disease.
Nonprescription medications such as aspirin or nonaspirin painreliever, antidiarrhea medication, antacid (for upset stomach) and laxative.