nonathlete

nonathlete

(ˌnɒnˈæθliːt)
n
a person who is not an athlete
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The study involved 3,878 nonathlete participants who were 41 to 85 years old.
A mentoring program pairs a student-athlete with a nonathlete student (often in a similar degree program) to help the athlete navigate student life, says David Eagan, assistant provost and associate director of athletics-student services and NCAA compliance.
While that would clearly be considered abnormal in a nonathlete or a recreational sports enthusiast, his experience has been that wall thickness in the 12- to 15-mm range in elite athletes can represent physiological adaptation to their enormous cardiovascular workloads.
Gayles, Rockenbach, and Davis (2012) examined national survey data from college students and found that student-athletes did not differ from their nonathlete peers in their goals for social activism.
In all, 12 mumps cases (five confirmed and seven probable) in five counties were identified in persons who were nonathlete participants or attendees at three cheerleading competitions or were household contacts of mumps patients.
I, a nonathlete and non-runner with bad knees, completed a 5k in a better time than I expected.
The second volume addresses general social trends for women in sports, including participation and exclusion in specific sports and in traditionally masculine sports like football officiating, surfing, and boxing; stereotypes about perceived size and strength; womenAEs experiences in mixed-sex university programs; media coverage of womenAEs professional soccer and basketball; and obstacles faced in nonathlete roles in sports organizations.
The aim of our study is to determine the result of reconstruction of MCL in case of traumatic valgus instability of elbow in both athlete & nonathlete population.
Since collegiate student-athletes are less likely than nonathlete peers to seek help for depression, they may be at a greater risk of suicide (Armstrong, Burcin, Bjerke, & Early, 2015).
Generally, successful exertion among athletes may require willpower to force oneself to continue despite physical fatigue, so we could expect that athletes, who have presumably participated in regular exercise for years, will be less likely to experience willpower depletion than the nonathlete. It is important to note that in these studies "improvement was in the form of increased stamina (resistance to the debilitating effects of resource depletion), rather than increased capacity" (Oaten and Cheng 2006a, 2006b).
The effect of selected aerobic exercise program on pulmonary volumes and capacities of nonathlete male students.
On the other hand we found that according to measured FVC values nonathlete males may require slightly reduced TV of 5.8 mL/kg and females of 6.3 mL/kg.