nonathletic

nonathletic

(ˌnɒnæθˈlɛtɪk)
adj
lacking athletic ability or interest
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I remember one shirtless, nonathletic chubby boy begging kids to quickly hit him with a ball and send him to the bench before a bully could get the chance to nail him so hard that his belly sported a painful, red "Voit" tattoo for the rest of the day.
This ideology then spills into society and is formed into a binary image of what it means to be a man, where gays serve as a point of comparison to reaffirm the ideal heterosexual athlete (Lehne, 1976), whether this be athletic or nonathletic, masculine or feminine.
Trantham said the $43 million to $55 million in project costs won't take away from any nonathletic university needs.
For example, Iowa puts a $100 limit per item on clothing and nonathletic shoes; Ohio imposes a $75 limit on clothing articles (beach capes are exempt, sunglasses are not); Tennessee exempts computers up to $1,500; Missouri limits the total amount of school supplies to $50 per purchase; and South Carolina does not put a dollar limit on items.
I made it a point to eat mindfully, did aqua exercises three times a week, perfect for a nonathletic me-despite the effort it calls for, the water keeps me safe from breaking anything.
The 117 oligomenorrheic athletes (OA) they investigated--none of whom had formally diagnosed eating disorders--scored significantly higher on measures of body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, perfectionism, and "cognitive restraint of eating," compared with 50 female athletes and 41 nonathletic women, both with normal periods.
Subjects with regular periods had mean BMIs of about 22 kg/[m.sub.2]; mean estradiol levels were 70.2 pg/mL in eumenorrheic athletes and 83.6 pg/mL in nonathletic women.
This postal questionnaire survey evaluated disease control and use of asthma medication in 141 elite endurance athletes with asthma and a reference population of 275 nonathletic patients with asthma.
These equations have been developed in athletic and nonathletic populations and they have a too wide variability of estimation when applied to the same subject/population.
Also, Watson compared the attitude toward help seeking behavior and expectation of 135 college student athletes, and the findings indicate a significant difference was found of student athletes and nonathletic forms of information seeking, including the counseling service was important information for training etc.
If not a direct substitution, the hype and acclaim surrounding athletics may likewise encourage athletes to focus less on academic preparedness, so much so that we could anticipate student athletes sub-optimally investing in nonathletic human capital in favor of sport.