nonbiographical

nonbiographical

(ˌnɒnˌbaɪəˈɡræfɪkəl)
adj
not biographical, not relating to biography or events in a person's life
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, the parables contemporary association with the prelacy controversy offers a new reading of Sonnet 19 "When I consider how my light is spent." I suggest a political and nonbiographical reading of the sonnet, in which readers are compelled to identify with the poetic speaker and reflect upon their own labors of reformation in the final days before judgment.
and offers a political, nonbiographical, and nonteleological interpretation, in which the poetic speaker is an anonymous subject with whom any contemporary reader familiar with the rhetoric of reform might identify.
While Bonhoeffer exhibited such pastoral sensibilities in some of his letters to former students in the 1940s, the argument about the nonbiographical nature of the Ethics passages largely depends upon one's acceptance of the preceding argument discussed above: that is to say, if Bonhoeffer was not directly involved in attempts to assassinate Hitler, then it makes sense that he was not writing autobiographically about guilt and responsibility in Ethics.
In addition to the biographical pieces, Women in Space is full of nonbiographical, space-related sidebars, such as careers in space, how to eat and live in space, the history of the Russian space program, the International Space Station, and plans for future space endeavors.
In the nonbiographical chapters, Wiley discusses Tchaikovsky's works by opus number (when present), but there are no markers heralding the transition to the next work.
This makes the Companion useful for students to look up information on a particular text: that is, the emphasis is on the importance of specific works, with little in the way of information about the author (it is nonbiographical) and little information on the sociohistorical context (it is noncultural studies).
It is individualized and privatized, a historical and nonbiographical. As feminists of color and from the Third World have pointed out, [18] some Second Wave feminists-mostly white and of the middle class-have also reproduced a privatized and individualized female self, owner of a body defined by its "unique" and private capacity to reproduce.
(7.) These schematic readings of Cane form the bulk of the nonbiographical Toomer criticism.
These frames are often biographical or factual nonbiographical; but they can also be a part of his fictional creation.