nonbreeder

nonbreeder

(ˌnɒnˈbriːdə)
n
1. (Breeds) animal husbandry a person who does not breed animals
2. (Biology) biology an animal or segment of an animal species that does not breed
References in periodicals archive ?
I was delighted to see that a younger man didn't want to adopt children ["Proud to Be a Nonbreeder," September].
A possible hypothesis to explain the origin of the outbreaks was that nonbreeder kelp gulls carried P multocida gallicida to Hope Bay, and avian cholera was transmitted through water to skuas and penguins.
The potential for nuclear energy is large, but current estimates of accessible world uranium resources are too small to support a world energy infrastructure predominantly based on conventional (that is, nonbreeder) nuclear power.
She reflects amusingly on bartering for sex in long term relationships, and on the--literally--explosive miracle of childbirth despite the fact she's a staunch nonbreeder ("I ovulate sand").
Farm A is one of six turkey breeder farms in county A owned by a company that also operates nonbreeder farms and a turkey meat processing plant in county A.
Just one nonbreeder can cost up to $500 to buy and maintain--not to mention the lost potential of lambs not born.
He was, so to speak, a nonbreeder in more ways than one.
Key words: avian demography, Forpus passerinus; Green-rumped Parrotlet; mark-recapture; multistate models; nonbreeder; site fidelity; social systems; survival; tropical vs.
For one thing, although group dynamics might make a wolf a nonbreeder one year, the animal might breed at another time under different circumstances, unlike ants or termites.
In most cases, it was easy to determine whether a bird was a breeder or a nonbreeder. However, the distinction between nonbreeders that began to build a nest but did not lay and birds that lost their clutch because of early predation raised problems.
Thus each adult is randomly classified as a breeder or nonbreeder, based on the probability of breeding (b), a sex-dependent parameter of the model.
If reproductive effort or a suitable surrogate (e.g., status as a breeder or a nonbreeder) could be identified or measured on captured individuals, then it should be possible to extend the multistate modeling approach of Nichols et al.