noncelebrity

noncelebrity

(ˌnɒnsɪˈlɛbrɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
a person who is not a celebrity
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, the same questions still bug me whenever I hear or read cases of suicide, whether by a celebrity or noncelebrity, young or old, known to me or not.
Even regular, noncelebrity people cultivate their own brands.
Literature exploring celebrity endorsements has generally employed the source credibility model (Ohanian, 1990) to show that an expert or noncelebrity endorsement is more effective than an endorsement by a celebrity (Biswas, Biswas, & Das, 2006; Eisend & Langner, 2010; Gaied & Rached, 2010).
Typically, people rarely know the identity of a noncelebrity endorser, but this was not the case for the advertisements in this study.
There will be plenty of noncelebrity challenges for Feresten as well, including a couple looking to live off the grid for a year, an art director who wants a motorcycle with a sidecar for his bulldog and a retired NFL player who wants a classy ride on a budget.
Approving fan Paul Glover tweeted: "A nice normal noncelebrity name." And Louise Fowler wrote: "Loving Andy Murray & Kim Sears' baby girl's beautiful name.
So quite why Celebs On Benefits resorted to featuring a noncelebrity unemployed teacher and a deluded little wannabe actor remains a mystery.
The night's only noncelebrity reader, Michaela Coplen, was a student poet who recited her own "Redeployment.''
I can't name a noncelebrity who has been imitated by more people.
A noncelebrity, nonpower journalist can actually have much influence.
Stephen and Oliver Toubia monitored the twitter activity of 100 twitter accounts made by their research assistants, who followed 2,500 Twitter users who were noncorporate and noncelebrity. They observed how the increase in audience size affected the users' tweeting activity.