nonchalance


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non·cha·lant

 (nŏn′shə-länt′)
adj.
Casually unconcerned or indifferent. See Synonyms at cool.

[French, from Old French, present participle of nonchaloir, to be unconcerned : non-, non- + chaloir, to cause concern to (from Latin calēre, to be warm, heat up; see kelə- in Indo-European roots).]

non′cha·lance′ (-läns′) n.
non′cha·lant′ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

non•cha•lance

(ˌnɒn ʃəˈlɑns, ˈnɒn ʃəˌlɑns, -ləns)

n.
cool indifference or lack of concern; casualness.
[1670–80; < French]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nonchalance - the trait of remaining calm and seeming not to carenonchalance - the trait of remaining calm and seeming not to care; a casual lack of concern
carefreeness - the trait of being without worry or responsibility
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

nonchalance

noun indifference, insouciance, detachment, unconcern, cool (slang), calm, apathy, composure, carelessness, equanimity, casualness, sang-froid, self-possession, dispassion, imperturbability He walked in with exaggerated nonchalance, his hands in his pockets.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

nonchalance

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَدَم اكْتِراث، عَدَم اهْتِمام
lhostejnostnenucenost
nonchalanceuberørthed
közönyösségnemtörődömség
kæruleysi
ilgisizlikkayıtsızlıklık

nonchalance

[ˈnɒnʃələns] N
1. (= casualness) → despreocupación f
with affected nonchalancecon un descuido afectado
2. (= indifference) → falta f de interés
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nonchalance

[ˈnɒnʃələns] nnonchalance f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nonchalance

nLässigkeit f, → Nonchalance f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

nonchalance

[ˈnɒnʃləns] ndisinvoltura, indifferenza
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

nonchalant

(ˈnonʃələnt) , ((American) nonʃəˈlont) adjective
feeling or showing no excitement, fear or other emotion.
ˈnonchalantly adverb
ˈnonchalance noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
She couldn't cross them with any successful nonchalance.
He sat on a table in the Johnson home and dangled his checked legs with an enticing nonchalance. His hair was curled down over his forehead in an oiled bang.
He treated his Serene Highness with a somewhat affected nonchalance intended to show that, as a highly trained military man, he left it to Russians to make an idol of this useless old man, but that he knew whom he was dealing with.
Yet I could not but perceive that she was at times unhappy and dissatisfied with herself or her position, and truly I myself was not quite contented with the latter: this assumption of brotherly nonchalance was very hard to sustain, and I often felt myself a most confounded hypocrite with it all; I saw too, or rather I felt, that, in spite of herself, 'I was not indifferent to her,' as the novel heroes modestly express it, and while I thankfully enjoyed my present good fortune, I could not fail to wish and hope for something better in future; but, of course, I kept such dreams entirely to myself.
Sabin, though his eyes seemed everywhere, retained to the full extent that nonchalance of manner which all his life he had so assiduously cultivated.
He accepted the incident as a sign that her nonchalance was affected.
He looked about him always, with the cold, easy nonchalance of the man of the world.
"Plenty good boy stop along Langa-Langa?" Van Horn, unperturbed, politely queried, in order to make conversation and advertise nonchalance.
But now she knew that she was about to pass a group of gentlemen, who were standing at the door of the billiard-rooms, and she could not help seeing young Torry step out a little with his glass at his eye, and bow to her with that air of nonchalance which he might have bestowed on a friendly barmaid.
"Downers," the men called them; and the packing house had a special elevator upon which they were raised to the killing beds, where the gang proceeded to handle them, with an air of businesslike nonchalance which said plainer than any words that it was a matter of everyday routine.
This nonchalance made for easy transition from one place to another, and the whole simplicity of staging had the important advantage of allowing the audience to center their attention on the play rather than on the accompaniments.
With an air of nonchalance which, under the circumstances, seemed to me to border upon affectation, he lounged up and down the pavement, and gazed vacantly at the ground, the sky, the opposite houses and the line of railings.