nonclerical

nonclerical

(ˌnɒnˈklɛrɪkəl)
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity not belonging to or related to the clergy
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Recently elevated by Pope Francis to the position of Sweden's first-ever cardinal, the remarks build on earlier calls by the pope to increase the meaningful participation of women at all levels of the church--at least in nonclerical ways.
Although nonclerical errors are much more difficult to identify, it is not unreasonable to postulate that these may also be correlated with the number of required data elements.
This group represents temporary, non-benefited employees performing nonclerical duties for auxiliary services, physical plant, housing services and parking services and who have worked at least 10 hours per week for at least 6 workweeks and are scheduled to work 30+ hours per week.
8% (10,404) of advisors reporting employing 50 or fewer nonclerical individuals -- while 56.
Just as the church, it too, in a certain sense, is a divinely human organization, but now with prevalence of the human principle, which is possible only because this state has a realization of the divine principle not in itself, but before itself--in the Church, so that the Deity gives here, in the state, complete free range to the human principle, and to its nonclerical service to the higher goal.
Most of the church's great theological thinkers were bishops or abbots and there was as yet no separate education for clerics and the relatively few nonclerical theologians that existed.
However, in the case of the Catholic clergy, notions of masculinity and their corresponding gender performances differ from those of their nonclerical male counterparts.
Published under the title Propagation of the Gospel in the East in 1709, 1711, and 1718, sets of these reports served to generate support from the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK), a private and nonclerical agency founded in 1698 to increase Christian education and literature in Anglican domains among unbaptized natives in America and the West Indies.
This perpetuated the social isolation of the clergy, for it was almost unheard-of for someone from a nonclerical estate to become a priest.
The texts examined have been self-consciously selected to provide an alternative 'noncourtly, antiromance, un-Petrarchan, and nonclerical discourse on women, gender, and marriage' (p.
This form of ideology and leadership is all the more distinctive in that many other Islamist revolutionary movements before and since--such as those of Afghanistan, Egypt or Algeria (and, by extension, al-Qaida)--have had nonclerical leaders.